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The first mile: community experience of outbreak control during an Ebola outbreak in Luwero District, Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
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Title
The first mile: community experience of outbreak control during an Ebola outbreak in Luwero District, Uganda
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-2852-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel H. de Vries, Jude T. Rwemisisi, Laban K. Musinguzi, Turinawe E. Benoni, Denis Muhangi, Marije de Groot, David Kaawa-Mafigiri, Robert Pool

Abstract

A major challenge to outbreak control lies in early detection of viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) in local community contexts during the critical initial stages of an epidemic, when risk of spreading is its highest ("the first mile"). In this paper we document how a major Ebola outbreak control effort in central Uganda in 2012 was experienced from the perspective of the community. We ask to what extent the community became a resource for early detection, and identify problems encountered with community health worker and social mobilization strategies. Analysis is based on first-hand ethnographic data from the center of a small Ebola outbreak in Luwero Country, Uganda, in 2012. Three of this paper's authors were engaged in an 18 month period of fieldwork on community health resources when the outbreak occurred. In total, 13 respondents from the outbreak site were interviewed, along with 21 key informants and 61 focus group respondents from nearby Kaguugo Parish. All informants were chosen through non-probability sampling sampling. Our data illustrate the lack of credibility, from an emic perspective, of biomedical explanations which ignore local understandings. These explanations were undermined by an insensitivity to local culture, a mismatch between information circulated and the local interpretative framework, and the inability of the emergency response team to take the time needed to listen and empathize with community needs. Stigmatization of the local community - in particular its belief in amayembe spirits - fuelled historical distrust of the external health system and engendered community-level resistance to early detection. Given the available anthropological knowledge of a previous outbreak in Northern Uganda, it is surprising that so little serious effort was made this time round to take local sensibilities and culture into account. The "first mile" problem is not only a question of using local resources for early detection, but also of making use of the contextual cultural knowledge that has already been collected and is readily available. Despite remarkable technological innovations, outbreak control remains contingent upon human interaction and openness to cultural difference.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 112 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 21%
Student > Master 23 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 14 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 25 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 3%
Other 18 16%
Unknown 21 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,236,071
of 17,364,317 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,337
of 11,737 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,304
of 273,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,364,317 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,737 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.