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Is agriculture driving the diversification of the Bemisia tabaci species complex (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Aleyrodidae)?: Dating, diversification and biogeographic evidence revealed

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
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Title
Is agriculture driving the diversification of the Bemisia tabaci species complex (Hemiptera: Sternorrhyncha: Aleyrodidae)?: Dating, diversification and biogeographic evidence revealed
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-13-228
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura M Boykin, Charles D Bell, Gregory Evans, Ian Small, Paul J De Barro

Abstract

Humans and insect herbivores are competing for the same food crops and have been for thousands of years. Despite considerable advances in crop pest management, losses due to insects remain considerable. The global homogenisation of agriculture has supported the range expansion of numerous insect pests and has been driven in part by human-assisted dispersal supported through rapid global trade and low-cost air passenger transport. One of these pests, is the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, a cryptic species complex that contains some of the world's most damaging pests of agriculture. The complex shows considerable genetic diversity and strong phylogeographic relationships. One consequence of the considerable impact that members of the B. tabaci complex have on agriculture, is the view that human activity, particularly in relation to agricultural practices, such as use of insecticides, has driven the diversification found within the species complex. This has been particularly so in the case of two members of the complex, Middle East-Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1) and Mediterranean (MED), which have become globally distributed invasive species. An alternative hypothesis is that diversification is due to paleogeographic and paleoclimatological changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 101 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 21%
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Professor 6 6%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 15 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 72 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Environmental Science 6 6%
Mathematics 1 <1%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 20 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 August 2016.
All research outputs
#13,741,889
of 17,904,439 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#2,370
of 2,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,454
of 196,309 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,904,439 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,800 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.8. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.