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Trypanosoma vivax is the second leading cause of camel trypanosomosis in Sudan after Trypanosoma evansi

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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59 Mendeley
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Title
Trypanosoma vivax is the second leading cause of camel trypanosomosis in Sudan after Trypanosoma evansi
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-2117-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ehab Mossaad, Bashir Salim, Keisuke Suganuma, Peter Musinguzi, Mohammed A. Hassan, E. A. Elamin, G. E. Mohammed, Amel O. Bakhiet, Xuenan Xuan, Rawan A. Satti, Noboru Inoue

Abstract

This study was conducted in response to recurring reports from eastern Sudan of camel trypanosomosis that can no longer be treated by currently available trypanocidal drugs. One hundred and eighty-nine blood samples were obtained from camels in different herds and local markets in the western part of Sudan, and a cross-sectional study was carried out between December 2015 and February 2016 to identify the causative agents and possible circulating genotypes. The prevalence of trypanosomes detected using the conventional parasitological techniques of Giemsa-stained blood smears, wet blood smears and the microhematocrit centrifugation technique (MHCT) was 7% (13/189), 11% (21/189) and 19% (36/189), respectively. However, a multi-species KIN-PCR targeting the ITS region revealed that the prevalence of Trypanosoma evansi was 37% (70/189), while that of T. vivax was 25% (47/189). Consequently, we used a T. evansi-specific PCR (RoTat1.2 VSG gene) to analyse the KIN-PCR-positive samples and a T. vivax-specific PCR (Cathepsin L-like gene) to analyse all of the samples. The prevalence of T. evansi was 59% (41/70), while the prevalence of T. vivax was 31% (59/189). Mixed infections were detected in 18% (34/189) of the samples. These results were further confirmed by sequencing and a phylogenetic analysis of the complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of T. evansi and the TviCatL gene of T. vivax. We conclude that T. vivax was newly introduced to the camel population and that T. evansi is no longer the single cause of camel trypanosomosis in Sudan. The presence of T. vivax in camels detected in this study is a challenge in the choice of diagnostic approaches, particularly serology, and PCRs. However, an analysis of drug resistance should be performed, and the genotypic variation should be verified. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular study on T. vivax and mixed-infection with T. vivax and T. evansi in Sudanese camels.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 19%
Student > Master 8 14%
Researcher 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 14 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 11 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2017.
All research outputs
#6,759,161
of 13,047,215 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,159
of 3,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,887
of 263,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,047,215 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,448 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,548 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them