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Reducing office workers’ sitting time: rationale and study design for the Stand Up Victoria cluster randomized trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#38 of 11,738)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
42 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
388 Mendeley
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Title
Reducing office workers’ sitting time: rationale and study design for the Stand Up Victoria cluster randomized trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-13-1057
Pubmed ID
Authors

David W Dunstan, Glen Wiesner, Elizabeth G Eakin, Maike Neuhaus, Neville Owen, Anthony D LaMontagne, Marj Moodie, Elisabeth AH Winkler, Brianna S Fjeldsoe, Sheleigh Lawler, Genevieve N Healy

Abstract

Excessive time spent in sedentary behaviours (sitting or lying with low energy expenditure) is associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Desk-based office workers typically accumulate high amounts of daily sitting time, often in prolonged unbroken bouts. The Stand Up Victoria study aims to determine whether a 3-month multi-component intervention in the office setting reduces workplace sitting, particularly prolonged, unbroken sitting time, and results in improvements in cardio-metabolic biomarkers and work-related outcomes, compared to usual practice.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 388 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 377 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 90 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 15%
Student > Bachelor 46 12%
Researcher 39 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 6%
Other 77 20%
Unknown 55 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 85 22%
Sports and Recreations 53 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 46 12%
Psychology 30 8%
Social Sciences 25 6%
Other 77 20%
Unknown 72 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 359. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2018.
All research outputs
#47,629
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#38
of 11,738 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#450
of 194,678 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 1,080 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,738 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,678 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,080 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.