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Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, January 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
157 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
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Title
Published in
Critical Care, January 2002
DOI 10.1186/cc1451
Pubmed ID
Authors

Spyros Papiris, Anastasia Kotanidou, Katerina Malagari, Charis Roussos

Abstract

Severe asthma, although difficult to define, includes all cases of difficult/therapy-resistant disease of all age groups and bears the largest part of morbidity and mortality from asthma. Acute, severe asthma, status asthmaticus, is the more or less rapid but severe asthmatic exacerbation that may not respond to the usual medical treatment. The narrowing of airways causes ventilation perfusion imbalance, lung hyperinflation, and increased work of breathing that may lead to ventilatory muscle fatigue and life-threatening respiratory failure. Treatment for acute, severe asthma includes the administration of oxygen, beta2-agonists (by continuous or repetitive nebulisation), and systemic corticosteroids. Subcutaneous administration of epinephrine or terbutaline should be considered in patients not responding adequately to continuous nebulisation, in those unable to cooperate, and in intubated patients not responding to inhaled therapy. The exact time to intubate a patient in status asthmaticus is based mainly on clinical judgment, but intubation should not be delayed once it is deemed necessary. Mechanical ventilation in status asthmaticus supports gas-exchange and unloads ventilatory muscles until aggressive medical treatment improves the functional status of the patient. Patients intubated and mechanically ventilated should be appropriately sedated, but paralytic agents should be avoided. Permissive hypercapnia, increase in expiratory time, and promotion of patient-ventilator synchronism are the mainstay in mechanical ventilation of status asthmaticus. Close monitoring of the patient's condition is necessary to obviate complications and to identify the appropriate time for weaning. Finally, after successful treatment and prior to discharge, a careful strategy for prevention of subsequent asthma attacks is imperative.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 4 1%
Spain 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Uruguay 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 315 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 52 16%
Other 42 13%
Student > Postgraduate 39 12%
Researcher 35 11%
Student > Master 29 9%
Other 96 29%
Unknown 38 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 200 60%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 14 4%
Engineering 8 2%
Other 21 6%
Unknown 48 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 July 2021.
All research outputs
#1,348,017
of 19,225,771 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#1,268
of 5,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,904
of 282,156 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#17
of 187 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,225,771 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,568 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,156 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 187 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.