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Plasma cell disorders in HIV-infected patients: epidemiology and molecular mechanisms

Overview of attention for article published in Biomarker Research, February 2013
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Plasma cell disorders in HIV-infected patients: epidemiology and molecular mechanisms
Published in
Biomarker Research, February 2013
DOI 10.1186/2050-7771-1-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Woodrow J Coker, Ashley Jeter, Henning Schade, Yubin Kang

Abstract

Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has significantly improved the outcome and survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Subsequently, long-term morbidities including cancer have become of major public health and clinical interest for this patient population. Plasma cell disorders occur at higher incidence in HIV-infected patients; however, the molecular mechanisms driving the plasma cell disease process and the optimal management for these patients remain to be defined. This article provides an up-to-date review of the characteristics and management of HIV-infected patients with plasma cell disorders. We first present 3 cases of plasma cell disorders in HIV-infected patients, ranging from polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia to symptomatic multiple myeloma. We then discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of each of these plasma cell disorders, with an emphasis on the molecular events underlying the progression of plasma cell diseases from monoclonal gammopathy to symptomatic multiple myeloma. We propose a three-step hypothesis for the development of multiple myeloma. Finally, we discuss the use of high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the treatment of HIV-infected patients with multiple myeloma. Our review includes the care of HIV-infected patients with plasma cell disorders in the current era of HAART and novel agents available for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 8 17%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Decision Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2013.
All research outputs
#12,357,523
of 18,796,975 outputs
Outputs from Biomarker Research
#90
of 208 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,345
of 282,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biomarker Research
#10
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,796,975 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 208 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,892 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.