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Re-emergence of hereditary polyneuropathy in Scandinavian Alaskan malamute dogs—old enemy or new entity? A case series

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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3 Dimensions

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24 Mendeley
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Title
Re-emergence of hereditary polyneuropathy in Scandinavian Alaskan malamute dogs—old enemy or new entity? A case series
Published in
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13028-017-0295-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karin Hultin Jäderlund, Cecilia Rohdin, Mette Berendt, Øyvind Stigen, Merete Fredholm, Arild Espenes, Inge Bjerkås, Lars Moe

Abstract

A homozygous mutation has been identified in the N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in recent cases of polyneuropathy in Alaskan malamute dogs from the Nordic countries and USA. The objective of the present study was to determine if cases diagnosed 30-40 years ago with polyneuropathy in the Alaskan malamute breed in Norway had the same hereditary disease as the recent cases. Fourteen historical cases and 12 recently diagnosed Alaskan malamute dogs with hereditary polyneuropathy, and their parents and littermates (n = 88) were included in this study (total n = 114). After phenotyping of historical and recent cases, NDRG1 genotyping was performed using DNA extracted from archived material from five Norwegian dogs affected by the disease in the late 1970s and 1980s. In addition, pedigrees were analysed. Our study concluded that historical and recent phenotypic polyneuropathy cases were carrying the same NDRG1-mutation. The pedigree analysis showed that all affected Alaskan malamute cases with polyneuropathy could be traced back to one common ancestor of North American origin. By this study, a well-documented example of the silent transmission of recessive disease-causing alleles through many generations is provided, demonstrated by the re-emergence of a phenotypically and genetically uniform entity in the Scandinavian Alaskan malamute population.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 29%
Researcher 3 13%
Student > Master 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 6 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2021.
All research outputs
#11,930,683
of 21,513,077 outputs
Outputs from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#248
of 733 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,911
of 283,322 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,513,077 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 733 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,322 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them