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Short-term motor learning through non-immersive virtual reality task in individuals with down syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, April 2017
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1 tweeter

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171 Mendeley
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Title
Short-term motor learning through non-immersive virtual reality task in individuals with down syndrome
Published in
BMC Neurology, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12883-017-0852-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carlos Bandeira de Mello Monteiro, Talita Dias da Silva, Luiz Carlos de Abreu, Felipe Fregni, Luciano Vieira de Araujo, Fernando Henrique Inocêncio Borba Ferreira, Claudio Leone

Abstract

Down syndrome (DS) has unique physical, motor and cognitive characteristics. Despite cognitive and motor difficulties, there is a possibility of intervention based on the knowledge of motor learning. However, it is important to study the motor learning process in individuals with DS during a virtual reality task to justify the use of virtual reality to organize intervention programs. The aim of this study was to analyze the motor learning process in individuals with DS during a virtual reality task. A total of 40 individuals participated in this study, 20 of whom had DS (24 males and 8 females, mean age of 19 years, ranging between 14 and 30 yrs.) and 20 typically developing individuals (TD) who were matched by age and gender to the individuals with DS. To examine this issue, we used software that uses 3D images and reproduced a coincidence-timing task. The results showed that all individuals improved performance in the virtual task, but the individuals with DS that started the task with worse performance showed higher difference from the beginning. Besides that, they were able to retain and transfer the performance with increase of speed of the task. Individuals with DS are able to learn movements from virtual tasks, even though the movement time was higher compared to the TD individuals. The results showed that individuals with DS who started with low performance improved coincidence- timing task with virtual objects, but were less accurate than typically developing individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02719600 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 171 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 171 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 28 16%
Student > Master 19 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 8%
Other 11 6%
Other 40 23%
Unknown 45 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 30 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 12%
Computer Science 12 7%
Sports and Recreations 11 6%
Psychology 10 6%
Other 38 22%
Unknown 49 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2017.
All research outputs
#11,695,107
of 17,993,131 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#1,178
of 1,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,713
of 274,566 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,993,131 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,965 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,566 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them