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Predictors of seeking financial compensation following motor vehicle trauma: inception cohort with moderate to severe musculoskeletal injuries

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
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Title
Predictors of seeking financial compensation following motor vehicle trauma: inception cohort with moderate to severe musculoskeletal injuries
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1535-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Darnel Murgatroyd, Ian A. Harris, Jian Sheng Chen, Sam Adie, Rajat Mittal, Ian D. Cameron

Abstract

Compensation related factors have been repeatedly associated with poor recovery following orthopaedic trauma. There is limited research into the factors associated with seeking financial compensation. Further understanding of these factors could facilitate injury recovery by purposeful compensation scheme design. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of seeking financial compensation, namely making a claim and seeking legal representation, following motor vehicle related orthopaedic trauma. The study was conducted in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, in motor vehicle crash and workers' compensation schemes. Participants were patients admitted with upper or lower extremity factures following a motor vehicle crash to two trauma hospitals. Data were collected at baseline within two weeks of injury. Participants were followed up at six months. Analysis involved: descriptive statistics for baseline characteristics; comparison of compensable and non-compensable participants with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and chi-squared tests; and logistic regression for predictor models. The cohort consisted of 452 participants with a mean age 40 years; 75% male; 74% working pre-injury; 30% in excellent pre-injury health; 56% sustained serious injuries with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) 9-15; 61% had a low-middle range household income; and 35% self-reported at fault in the crash. There was no significant difference in pre-injury/baseline health between compensable and non-compensable participants. Follow up data was available for 301 (67%) participants. The significant predictor of claiming compensation in the adjusted analysis was higher body mass index (BMI) (overweight Odds Ratio [OR] 3.05, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.63-5.68; obese OR 1.63, 95% CI 0.83-3.20). Participants less likely to claim were: involved in a motorcycle crash (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.28-0.82); socioeconomically less disadvantaged (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.17-0.82) or least disadvantaged (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.17-0.90); at risk for short term harm (injury) due to alcohol consumption (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32-0.97); and with fair-poor pre-injury health (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.94). The predictors for seeking legal representation were speaking a language other than English at home (OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.2-6.52) and lower household income (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.22-10.72). Participants less likely to seek legal representation were least socioeconomically disadvantaged (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.50). Seeking financial compensation was associated with a higher pre-injury BMI rather than injury-related factors. Seeking legal representation was solely related to socio-economic factors.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 15%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 13 20%
Unknown 13 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 6%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Engineering 3 5%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 15 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,593,193
of 11,194,639 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,652
of 2,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,522
of 265,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#50
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,194,639 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,317 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.