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Evaluation of efficacy of Interceptor® G2, a long-lasting insecticide net coated with a mixture of chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin, against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in Burkina…

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluation of efficacy of Interceptor® G2, a long-lasting insecticide net coated with a mixture of chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin, against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae s.l. in Burkina Faso
Published in
Malaria Journal, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1846-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Koama Bayili, Severin N’do, Moussa Namountougou, Roger Sanou, Abdoulaye Ouattara, Roch K. Dabiré, Anicet G. Ouédraogo, David Malone, Abdoulaye Diabaté

Abstract

Malaria vectors have acquired widespread resistance throughout sub-Saharan Africa to many of the currently used insecticides. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop alternative strategies including the development of new insecticides for effective management of insecticide resistance. To maintain progress against malaria, it is necessary to identify other residual insecticides for mosquito nets. In the present WHOPES phase II analogue study, the utility of chlorfenapyr, a pyrrole class insecticide mixed with alpha-cypermethrin on a long-lasting mosquito bed net was evaluated against Anopheles gambiae s.l. Bed nets treated with chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin and mixture of both compounds were tested for their efficacy on mosquitoes. Washed (20 times) and unwashed of each type of treated nets and were tested according to WHOPES guidelines. Efficacy of nets were expressed in terms of blood-feeding inhibition rate, deterrence, induced exophily and mortality rate. The evaluation was conducted in experimental huts of Vallée du Kou seven (VK7) in Burkina Faso (West Africa) following WHOPES phase II guidelines. In addition, a WHOPES phase I evaluation was also performed. Mixture treated nets killed significantly (P < 0.05) more mosquitoes than solo alpha-cypermethrin nets, unwashed and washed. Proportionally, this equated to mortalities of 78 and 76% (for mixture nets) compared to only 17 and 10% (for solo alpha-cypermethrin) to An. gambiae, respectively. In contrast mixture net proportions were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from nets treated with chlorfenapyr 200 mg/m(2) unwashed (86%). The washed and unwashed nets treated with the mixtures resulted in personal protection against An. gambiae s.l. biting 34 and 44%. In contrast the personal protection observed for washed and unwashed alpha-cypermethrin treated nets generated (14 and 24%), and chlorfenapyr solo treated net was rather low (22%). Among all nets trialled, the combination of chlorfenapyr and alpha-cypermethrin on bed nets provided better mortality in phase II after 20 washes. Results suggest that this combination could be a potential insecticide resistance management tool for preventing malaria transmission in areas compromised by the spread of pyrethroid resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 105 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 20%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 10%
Other 5 5%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 5%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Other 13 12%
Unknown 33 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2022.
All research outputs
#1,199,881
of 22,947,506 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#192
of 5,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,867
of 310,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#10
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,947,506 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,585 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.