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Worker reproduction of the invasive yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Zoology, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 611)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
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Title
Worker reproduction of the invasive yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes
Published in
Frontiers in Zoology, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12983-017-0210-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ching-Chen Lee, Hirotaka Nakao, Shu-Ping Tseng, Hung-Wei Hsu, Gwo-Li Lin, Jia-Wei Tay, Johan Billen, Fuminori Ito, Chow-Yang Lee, Chung-Chi Lin, Chin-Cheng (Scotty) Yang

Abstract

Reproductive division of labor is one of the key features of social insects. Queens are adapted for reproduction while workers are adapted for foraging and colony maintenance. In many species, however, workers retain functional ovaries and can lay unfertilized male eggs or trophic eggs. Here we report for the first time on the occurrence of physogastric workers and apparent worker reproduction in the invasive yellow crazy ant Anoplolepis gracilipes (Fr. Smith). We further examined the reproductive potential and nutritional role of physogastric workers through multidisciplinary approaches including morphological characterization, laboratory manipulation, genetic analysis and behavioral observation. Egg production with two types of eggs, namely reproductive and trophic eggs, by physogastric workers was found. The reproductive egg was confirmed to be haploid and male-destined, suggesting that the workers produced males via arrhenotokous parthenogenesis as no spermatheca was discovered. Detailed observations suggested that larvae were mainly fed with trophic eggs. Along with consumption of trophic eggs by queens and other castes as part of their diet, the vital role of physogastric workers as "trophic specialist" is confirmed. We propose that adaptive advantages derived from worker reproduction for A. gracilipes may include 1) trophic eggs provisioned by physogastric workers likely assist colonies of A. gracilipes in overcoming unfavorable conditions such as paucity of food during critical founding stage; 2) worker-produced males are fertile and thus might offer an inclusive fitness advantage for the doomed orphaned colony.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Austria 1 2%
Unknown 42 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 58%
Environmental Science 5 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 106. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2021.
All research outputs
#259,048
of 19,157,212 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Zoology
#17
of 611 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,202
of 277,646 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Zoology
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,157,212 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 611 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,646 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them