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The SITLESS project: exercise referral schemes enhanced by self-management strategies to battle sedentary behaviour in older adults: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, May 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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300 Mendeley
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Title
The SITLESS project: exercise referral schemes enhanced by self-management strategies to battle sedentary behaviour in older adults: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
Published in
Trials, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-1956-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Giné-Garriga, Laura Coll-Planas, Míriam Guerra, Àlex Domingo, Marta Roqué, Paolo Caserotti, Michael Denkinger, Dietrich Rothenbacher, Mark A. Tully, Frank Kee, Emma McIntosh, Carme Martín-Borràs, Guillermo R. Oviedo, Javier Jerez-Roig, Marta Santiago, Oriol Sansano, Guillermo Varela, Mathias Skjødt, Katharina Wirth, Dhayana Dallmeier, Jochen Klenk, Jason J. Wilson, Nicole E. Blackburn, Manuela Deidda, Guillaume Lefebvre, Denise González, Antoni Salvà

Abstract

Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the world's population. Recent evidence indicates that excessive sitting time is harmful to health, independent of meeting the recommended moderate to vigorous physical activity (PA) guidelines. The SITLESS project aims to determine whether exercise referral schemes (ERS) can be enhanced by self-management strategies (SMSs) to reduce sedentary behaviour (SB), increase PA and improve health, quality of life and function in the long term, as well as psychosocial outcomes in community-dwelling older European citizens from four countries, within a three-armed pragmatic randomised controlled trial, compared with ERS alone and also with general recommendations about PA. A total of 1338 older adults will be included in this study, recruited from four European countries through different existing primary prevention pathways. Participants will be randomly allocated into an ERS of 16 weeks (32 sessions, 45-60 min per session), ERS enhanced by seven sessions of SMSs and four telephone prompts, or a control group. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, month 4 (end of ERS intervention), month 16 (12 months post intervention) and month 22 (18 months post intervention). Primary outcomes will include measures of SB (time spent sedentary) and PA (counts per minute). Secondary outcomes will include muscle and physical function, health economics' related outcomes, anthropometry, quality of life, social networks, anxiety and depressive symptoms, disability, fear of falling, executive function and fatigue. A process evaluation will be conducted throughout the trial. The full analysis set will follow an intention-to-treat principle and will include all randomised participants for whom a baseline assessment is conducted. The study hypothesis will be tested with mixed linear models with repeated measures, to assess changes in the main outcomes (SB and PA) over time (baseline to month 22) and between study arms. The findings of this study may help inform the design and implementation of more effective interventions to reduce SB and increase PA levels, and hence improve long-term health outcomes in the older adult population. SITLESS aims to support policy-makers in deciding how or whether ERS should be further implemented or restructured in order to increase its adherence, impact and cost-effectiveness. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02629666 . Registered 19 November 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 300 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 300 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 56 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 14%
Student > Bachelor 32 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 8%
Researcher 16 5%
Other 47 16%
Unknown 81 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 49 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 43 14%
Psychology 41 14%
Sports and Recreations 29 10%
Social Sciences 16 5%
Other 30 10%
Unknown 92 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,177,867
of 14,221,929 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#442
of 3,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,766
of 267,059 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,221,929 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,720 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,059 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.