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Measuring psychological resilience to disasters: are evidence-based indicators an achievable goal?

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
81 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
244 Mendeley
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Title
Measuring psychological resilience to disasters: are evidence-based indicators an achievable goal?
Published in
Environmental Health, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/1476-069x-12-115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jose Manuel Rodriguez-Llanes, Femke Vos, Debarati Guha-Sapir

Abstract

Despite rising interest on the concept of societal resilience and its measurement, little has been done to provide operational indicators. Importantly, an evidence-based approach to assess the suitability of indicators remains unexplored. Furthermore few approaches that exist do not investigate indicators of psychological resilience, which is emerging as an important component of societal resilience to disasters. Disasters are events which overwhelm local capacities, often producing human losses, injury and damage to the affected communities. As climate hazards and disasters are likely to increase in the coming decades, strengthening the capacity of societies to withstand these shocks and recover quickly is vital. In this review, we search the Web of Knowledge to summarize the evidence on indicators of psychological resilience to disasters and provided a qualitative assessment of six selected studies. We find that an evidence-based approach using features from systematic reviews is useful to compile, select and assess the evidence and elucidate robust indicators. We conclude that strong social support received after a disaster is associated with an increased psychological resilience whereas a female gender is connected with a decrease in the likelihood of a resilient outcome. These results are consistent across disaster settings and cultures and are representative of approximately 13 million disaster-exposed civilians of adult age. An approach such as this that collects and evaluates evidence will allow indicators of resilience to be much more revealing and useful in the future. They will provide a robust basis to prioritize indicators to act upon through intersectoral policies and post-disaster public health interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 244 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 1%
Portugal 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Unknown 235 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 16%
Student > Master 38 16%
Researcher 33 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 7%
Student > Postgraduate 14 6%
Other 46 19%
Unknown 58 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 41 17%
Social Sciences 39 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 25 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 6%
Environmental Science 13 5%
Other 46 19%
Unknown 66 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,216,719
of 22,664,644 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#253
of 1,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,732
of 305,788 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#6
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,664,644 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,480 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 305,788 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.