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Pesticide exposures and chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology: an epidemiologic review

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
38 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
98 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
278 Mendeley
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Title
Pesticide exposures and chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology: an epidemiologic review
Published in
Environmental Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12940-017-0254-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathieu Valcke, Marie-Eve Levasseur, Agnes Soares da Silva, Catharina Wesseling

Abstract

The main causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD) globally are diabetes and hypertension but epidemics of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) occur in Central America, Sri Lanka, India and beyond. Althoug also being observed in women, CKDu concentrates among men in agricultural sectors. Therefore, suspicions fell initially on pesticide exposure, but currently chronic heat stress and dehydration are considered key etiologic factors. Responding to persistent community and scientific concerns about the role of pesticides, we performed a systematic review of epidemiologic studies that addressed associations between any indicator of pesticide exposure and any outcome measure of CKD. Of the 21 analytical studies we identified, seven were categorized as with low, ten with medium and four with relatively high explanation value. Thirteen (62%) studies reported one or more positive associations, but four had a low explanation value and three presented equivocal results. The main limitations of both positive and negative studies were unspecific and unquantified exposure measurement ('pesticides'), the cross-sectional nature of most studies, confounding and selection bias. The four studies with stronger designs and better exposure assessment (from Sri Lanka, India and USA) all showed exposure-responses or clear associations, but for different pesticides in each study, and three of these studies were conducted in areas without CKDu epidemics. No study investigated interactions between pesticides and other concommittant exposures in agricultural occupations, in particular heat stress and dehydration. In conclusion, existing studies provide scarce evidence for an association between pesticides and regional CKDu epidemics but, given the poor pesticide exposure assessment in the majority, a role of nephrotoxic agrochemicals cannot be conclusively discarded. Future research should procure assessment of lifetime exposures to relevant specific pesticides and enough power to look into interactions with other major risk factors, in particular heat stress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 278 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 278 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 44 16%
Student > Master 34 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 11%
Researcher 21 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 6%
Other 51 18%
Unknown 82 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 9%
Environmental Science 23 8%
Social Sciences 15 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 4%
Other 55 20%
Unknown 98 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2022.
All research outputs
#474,360
of 22,551,053 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#127
of 1,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,518
of 289,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,551,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,471 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them