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First study conducted in Northern India that identifies group C rotavirus as the etiological agent of severe diarrhea in children in Delhi

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, May 2017
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Title
First study conducted in Northern India that identifies group C rotavirus as the etiological agent of severe diarrhea in children in Delhi
Published in
Virology Journal, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12985-017-0767-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vasundhara Razdan Tiku, Baoming Jiang, Praveen Kumar, Satender Aneja, Arvind Bagga, Maharaj Kishen Bhan, Pratima Ray

Abstract

Group C Rotavirus (RVC) is an enteric pathogen responsible for acute gastroenteritis in children and adults globally. At present there are no surveillance studies on group C Rotaviruses in India and therefore their prevalence in India remains unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate group C rotavirus infection among <5 years old children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in New Delhi. A total of 350 fecal specimens were collected during September 2013 to November 2014 from <5 years old diarrheal patients admitted at KSCH hospital, Delhi. The samples found negative for group A rotavirus (N = 180) by Enzyme immunoassay were screened for group C rotavirus by RT-PCR with VP6, VP7 and VP4 gene specific primers. The PCR products were further sequenced (VP6, VP7, VP4) and analyzed to ascertain their origin and G and P genotypes. Six out of 180 (group A rotavirus negative) samples were found positive for group C rotavirus by VP6 gene specific RT-PCR, of which 3 were also found positive for VP7 and VP4 genes. Phylogenetic analysis of VP7 and VP4 genes of these showed them to be G4 and P[2] genotypes. Overall, the nucleotide sequence data (VP6, VP7 and VP4) revealed a close relationship with the human group C rotavirus with no evidence of animal ancestry. Interestingly, the nucleotide sequence analysis of various genes also indicated differences in their origin. While the identity matrix of VP4 gene (n = 3) showed high amino acid sequence identity (97.60 to 98.20%) with Korean strain, the VP6 gene (n = 6) showed maximum identity with Nigerian strain (96.40 to 97.60%) and VP7 gene (n = 3) with Bangladeshi and USA strains. This is true for all analyzed samples. Our study demonstrated the group C rotavirus as the cause of severe diarrhea in young children in Delhi and provides insights on the origin of group C rotavirus genes among the local strains indicating their source of transmission. Our study also highlights the need for a simple and reliable diagnostic test that can be utilized to determine the disease burden due to group C rotavirus in India.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 14%
Student > Master 2 10%
Professor 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 24%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 10%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 5 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#9,635,103
of 12,550,112 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,516
of 2,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,306
of 265,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,112 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,103 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,531 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them