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Epidemiology of pertussis in Alberta, Canada 2004–2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2017
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2 tweeters

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13 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Epidemiology of pertussis in Alberta, Canada 2004–2015
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4468-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xianfang C. Liu, Christopher A. Bell, Kimberley A. Simmonds, Lawrence W. Svenson, Sumana Fathima, Steven J. Drews, Donald P. Schopflocher, Margaret L. Russell

Abstract

We describe the epidemiology of pertussis in Alberta, Canada by person, place, and time between 2004 and 2015, identify outbreak years, and examine vaccination coverage and vaccination timeliness. We used health data from Alberta's Communicable Disease Registry System for the period of January 1, 2004 through August 31, 2015 to identify unique cases of pertussis. Unique cases were deterministically linked to data in Alberta's immunization repository and health care insurance plan registry. Population estimates and vaccination coverage were extracted from Alberta's online Interactive Health Data Application. We estimated pertussis incidence rates per 100,000 persons by year, age group, gender, and health zone. Outbreak years were identified using a one-sided cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis by comparing annual incidence rates to baseline rates. Over the period, 3510 cases of pertussis were confirmed by laboratory testing or epidemiological linkage. Incidence rates per 100,000 persons were highest in 2004 (20.5), 2005 (13.6), and 2015 (10.4) for all age groups. Incidence rates were highest among the youngest age groups and decreased as age groups increased. Based on CUSUM analysis, 2008 and 2012 met the criteria for outbreak years. Vaccination coverage was over 90% among the general population, however only 61% of cases received at least one dose. About 60% of cases were diagnosed 5+ years after receiving the vaccine. Approximately 87-91% of vaccinated cases did not receive the first three vaccine doses in a timely manner. Pertussis incidence rates fluctuated over the period across all age groups. The majority of cases had no record of vaccination or were delayed in receiving vaccines. CUSUM analysis was an effective method for identifying outbreaks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 9 21%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Psychology 4 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 12 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,112,142
of 11,411,580 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,802
of 7,812 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,184
of 268,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#168
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,411,580 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,812 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,415 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.