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The need for preventive and curative services for malaria when the military is deployed in endemic overseas territories: a case study and lessons learned

Overview of attention for article published in Military Medical Research, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 167)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
The need for preventive and curative services for malaria when the military is deployed in endemic overseas territories: a case study and lessons learned
Published in
Military Medical Research, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40779-017-0128-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sumadhya Deepika Fernando, Rahuman Booso, Priyani Dharmawardena, Arunagirinathan Harintheran, Kugapiriyan Raviraj, Chaturaka Rodrigo, Manjula Danansuriya, Rajitha Wickremasinghe

Abstract

Sri Lanka has been free from indigenous malaria since November 2012 and received the WHO certificate for malaria-free status in September 2016. Due to increased global travel, imported malaria cases continue to be reported in the country. Military personnel returning home from international peace-keeping missions in malaria endemic countries represent a key risk group in terms of imported malaria. The present study intended to characterize the potential causes of a malaria outbreak among the Sri Lankan security forces personnel deployed in the Central African Republic (CAR). Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey distributed among Sri Lankan Air Force personnel who had returned from United Nations peace-keeping missions in the CAR region. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for the data collection, and focus group discussions were also conducted. One hundred twenty male Air Force personnel were interviewed (out of a group of 122 officers and airmen). All participants were deployed in the CAR for 14 months and were aware of the existence of chemoprophylaxis against malaria. The majority of the subjects (92.5%, 111/120) also knew that prophylaxis should be started prior to departure. However, the regular use of chemoprophylaxis was reported by only 61.7% (74/120) of the sample. Overall, 30.8% of the participants (37/120) had 44 symptomatic episodes of malaria during deployment, and one person succumbed to severe malaria. All cases were associated with noncompliance with chemoprophylaxis. Better coordination with overseas healthcare services and the establishment of directly observed chemoprophylaxis may help to avoid similar outbreaks in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Lecturer 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 2 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Psychology 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2019.
All research outputs
#7,676,132
of 14,515,669 outputs
Outputs from Military Medical Research
#42
of 167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,373
of 269,632 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Military Medical Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,515,669 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,632 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them