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Examining clinical similarities between myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and d-lactic acidosis: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
14 Facebook pages

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Examining clinical similarities between myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome and d-lactic acidosis: a systematic review
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12967-017-1229-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy Wallis, Michelle Ball, Sandra McKechnie, Henry Butt, Donald P. Lewis, Dorothy Bruck

Abstract

The pursuit for clarity in diagnostic and treatment pathways for the complex, chronic condition of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) continues. This systematic review raises a novel question to explore possible overlapping aetiology in two distinct conditions. Similar neurocognitive symptoms and evidence of D-lactate producing bacteria in ME/CFS raise questions about shared mechanisms with the acute condition of D-lactic acidosis (D-la). D-la case reports published between 1965 and March 2016 were reviewed for episodes describing both neurological symptoms and high D-lactate levels. Fifty-nine D-la episodes were included in the qualitative synthesis comparing D-la symptoms with ME/CFS diagnostic criteria. A narrative review of D-la mechanisms and relevance for ME/CFS was provided. The majority of neurological disturbances reported in D-la episodes overlapped with ME/CFS symptoms. Of these, the most frequently reported D-la symptoms were motor disturbances that appear more prominent during severe presentations of ME/CFS. Both patient groups shared a history of gastrointestinal abnormalities and evidence of bacterial dysbiosis, although only preliminary evidence supported the role of lactate-producing bacteria in ME/CFS. Interpretation of results are constrained by both the breadth of symptoms included in ME/CFS diagnostic criteria and the conservative methodology used for D-la symptom classification. Several pathophysiological mechanisms in ME/CFS were not examined. Shared symptomatology and underlying microbiota-gut-brain interactions raise the possibility of a continuum of acute (D-la) versus chronic (ME/CFS) presentations related to D-lactate absorption. Measurement of D-lactate in ME/CFS is needed to effectively evaluate whether subclinical D-lactate levels affect neurological symptoms in this clinical population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 17%
Student > Bachelor 11 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 12%
Other 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 9%
Other 18 23%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Psychology 6 8%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 48. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2020.
All research outputs
#609,073
of 19,767,699 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#106
of 3,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,171
of 285,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,767,699 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,473 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them