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Effects of peer health education on perception and practice of screening for cervical cancer among urban residential women in south-east Nigeria: a before and after study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, June 2017
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Title
Effects of peer health education on perception and practice of screening for cervical cancer among urban residential women in south-east Nigeria: a before and after study
Published in
BMC Women's Health, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12905-017-0399-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chinyere Mbachu, Cyril Dim, Uche Ezeoke

Abstract

Effective female education on cervical cancer prevention has been shown to increase awareness and uptake of screening. However, sustaining increase in uptake poses a challenge to control efforts. Peer health education has been used as an effective tool for ensuring sustained behavior change. This study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of peer health education on perception, willingness to screen and uptake of cervical cancer screening by women. A before and after intervention study was undertaken in 2 urban cities in Enugu state, Nigeria among women of reproductive age attending women's meeting in Anglican churches. Multistage sampling was used to select 300 women. Peer health education was provided once monthly for 3 consecutive sessions over a period of 3 months. Data was collected at baseline and after the intervention using pre-tested questionnaires. Descriptive statistics and tests of significance of observed differences and associations were done at p-value of <0.05. Statistical significant difference was observed in participants' individual risk perception for cervical cancer and perception of benefits of early detection through screening. Practice of screening for cervical cancer increased by 6.8% and the observed difference was statistically significant (p = 0.02). This was significantly associated with marital status, level of education, employment status and parity (p < 0.05). Peer health education is an effective strategy for increasing women's perception of benefits of early detection of cervical cancer through screening. It is also effective for increasing their practice of screening for cervical cancer.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 225 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 225 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 20%
Researcher 22 10%
Student > Bachelor 18 8%
Lecturer 17 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 7%
Other 42 19%
Unknown 65 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 55 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 52 23%
Social Sciences 12 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 3%
Psychology 5 2%
Other 17 8%
Unknown 77 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2017.
All research outputs
#21,665,390
of 24,180,797 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#1,890
of 2,083 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#280,471
of 320,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#12
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,180,797 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,083 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.