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Dynamics of transcriptional (re)-programming of syncytial nuclei in developing muscles

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, June 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Dynamics of transcriptional (re)-programming of syncytial nuclei in developing muscles
Published in
BMC Biology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12915-017-0386-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laetitia Bataillé, Hadi Boukhatmi, Jean-Louis Frendo, Alain Vincent

Abstract

A stereotyped array of body wall muscles enables precision and stereotypy of animal movements. In Drosophila, each syncytial muscle forms via fusion of one founder cell (FC) with multiple fusion competent myoblasts (FCMs). The specific morphology of each muscle, i.e. distinctive shape, orientation, size and skeletal attachment sites, reflects the specific combination of identity transcription factors (iTFs) expressed by its FC. Here, we addressed three questions: Are FCM nuclei naive? What is the selectivity and temporal sequence of transcriptional reprogramming of FCMs recruited into growing syncytium? Is transcription of generic myogenic and identity realisation genes coordinated during muscle differentiation? The tracking of nuclei in developing muscles shows that FCM nuclei are competent to be transcriptionally reprogrammed to a given muscle identity, post fusion. In situ hybridisation to nascent transcripts for FCM, FC-generic and iTF genes shows that this reprogramming is progressive, beginning by repression of FCM-specific genes in fused nuclei, with some evidence that FC nuclei retain specific characteristics. Transcription of identity realisation genes is linked to iTF activation and regulated at levels of both transcription initiation rate and period of transcription. The generic muscle differentiation programme is activated independently. Transcription reprogramming of fused myoblast nuclei is progressive, such that nuclei within a syncytial fibre at a given time point during muscle development are heterogeneous with regards to specific gene transcription. This comprehensive view of the dynamics of transcriptional (re)programming of post-mitotic nuclei within syncytial cells provides a new framework for understanding the transcriptional control of the lineage diversity of multinucleated cells.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 42%
Researcher 5 26%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 58%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 32%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2019.
All research outputs
#6,078,025
of 20,269,949 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#1,165
of 1,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,303
of 286,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,269,949 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,741 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.2. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,392 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them