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Clinical and genetic factors associated with kidney tubular dysfunction in a real-life single centre cohort of HIV-positive patients

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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Title
Clinical and genetic factors associated with kidney tubular dysfunction in a real-life single centre cohort of HIV-positive patients
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2497-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. E. Salvaggio, A. Giacomelli, F. S. Falvella, M. L. Oreni, P. Meraviglia, C. Atzori, E. G. I. Clementi, M. Galli, S. Rusconi

Abstract

Tenofovir (TDF) is one of the most widely used antiretroviral drug. Despite the high degree of tolerability a small percentage of patients experienced alteration in tubular function during TDF use. Intracellular TDF disposition is regulated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters and, a reduced transport activity may be implicated in accumulation of TDF into the cells. The aim of our study was to assess the major determinants of TDF associated tubular dysfunction (KTD) in a real-life setting including the usefulness of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping into ABCC2, ABCC4 and ABCC10 genes. We retrospectively analyzed all HIV positive patients who were followed at the Infectious Diseases Unit, DIBIC Luigi Sacco, University of Milan from April 2013 to June 2016. All patients treated with TDF who underwent a genotypization for the functional variants mapping in ABCC2 rs717620 (-24 C > T), ABCC4 rs1751034 (3463 A > G) and ABCC10 rs2125739 (T > C) were evaluated. KTD was defined as the presence of urine phosphate wasting and/or proteinuria at 24 h urine analysis. One hundred fifty-eight patients were genotyped, of which 42 (26.6%) experienced signs of KTD. No statistical significant differences were observed among patients with or without KTD regarding age, gender, ethnicity and comorbidities (hypertension and diabetes). The percentage of patients with KTD was higher among those with "GG" genotype at rs1751034 of ABCC4 compared to patients without KTD [6 (14.3%) vs 4 (3.5%), p = 0.01]. No statistical significant differences were observed regarding the distribution of ABCC2 and ABCC10 SNPs. Carriers of "G" allele in homozygous status at rs1751034 of ABCC4 showed a significant association with KTD (Odds Ratio 4.67, 95% CI 1.25-17.46, p = 0.02) in bivariate analysis, but this association was lost in multivariable analysis. A significant association between bone diseases and KTD was observed (Odds Ratio 3.178, 95%CI 1.529-6.603, p = 0.002). According to our results ABCC4 rs1751034 could be a genetic determinant of KTD; however validation studies are needed for therapy personalization. Noteworthy, a strong association between bone disease and KTD was also observed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 18%
Student > Master 8 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Researcher 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 14 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 17 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2017.
All research outputs
#9,773,529
of 12,231,187 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#3,201
of 4,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,699
of 271,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#65
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,231,187 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,496 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,692 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.