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“Like sugar in milk”: reconstructing the genetic history of the Parsi population

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
84 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
5 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
23 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
61 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
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Title
“Like sugar in milk”: reconstructing the genetic history of the Parsi population
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13059-017-1244-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gyaneshwer Chaubey, Qasim Ayub, Niraj Rai, Satya Prakash, Veena Mushrif-Tripathy, Massimo Mezzavilla, Ajai Kumar Pathak, Rakesh Tamang, Sadaf Firasat, Maere Reidla, Monika Karmin, Deepa Selvi Rani, Alla G. Reddy, Jüri Parik, Ene Metspalu, Siiri Rootsi, Kurush Dalal, Shagufta Khaliq, Syed Qasim Mehdi, Lalji Singh, Mait Metspalu, Toomas Kivisild, Chris Tyler-Smith, Richard Villems, Kumarasamy Thangaraj

Abstract

The Parsis are one of the smallest religious communities in the world. To understand the population structure and demographic history of this group in detail, we analyzed Indian and Pakistani Parsi populations using high-resolution genetic variation data on autosomal and uniparental loci (Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA). Additionally, we also assayed mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms among ancient Parsi DNA samples excavated from Sanjan, in present day Gujarat, the place of their original settlement in India. Among present-day populations, the Parsis are genetically closest to Iranian and the Caucasus populations rather than their South Asian neighbors. They also share the highest number of haplotypes with present-day Iranians and we estimate that the admixture of the Parsis with Indian populations occurred ~1,200 years ago. Enriched homozygosity in the Parsi reflects their recent isolation and inbreeding. We also observed 48% South-Asian-specific mitochondrial lineages among the ancient samples, which might have resulted from the assimilation of local females during the initial settlement. Finally, we show that Parsis are genetically closer to Neolithic Iranians than to modern Iranians, who have witnessed a more recent wave of admixture from the Near East. Our results are consistent with the historically-recorded migration of the Parsi populations to South Asia in the 7th century and in agreement with their assimilation into the Indian sub-continent's population and cultural milieu "like sugar in milk". Moreover, in a wider context our results support a major demographic transition in West Asia due to the Islamic conquest.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 84 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 7%
Other 13 21%
Unknown 14 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 8 13%
Unknown 16 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 148. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2023.
All research outputs
#234,939
of 23,007,053 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#102
of 4,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,660
of 317,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#3
of 65 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,007,053 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,140 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 65 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.