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Computing patient data in the cloud: practical and legal considerations for genetics and genomics research in Europe and internationally

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
32 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Computing patient data in the cloud: practical and legal considerations for genetics and genomics research in Europe and internationally
Published in
Genome Medicine, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13073-017-0449-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fruzsina Molnár-Gábor, Rupert Lueck, Sergei Yakneen, Jan O. Korbel

Abstract

Biomedical research is becoming increasingly large-scale and international. Cloud computing enables the comprehensive integration of genomic and clinical data, and the global sharing and collaborative processing of these data within a flexibly scalable infrastructure. Clouds offer novel research opportunities in genomics, as they facilitate cohort studies to be carried out at unprecedented scale, and they enable computer processing with superior pace and throughput, allowing researchers to address questions that could not be addressed by studies using limited cohorts. A well-developed example of such research is the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes project, which involves the analysis of petabyte-scale genomic datasets from research centers in different locations or countries and different jurisdictions. Aside from the tremendous opportunities, there are also concerns regarding the utilization of clouds; these concerns pertain to perceived limitations in data security and protection, and the need for due consideration of the rights of patient donors and research participants. Furthermore, the increased outsourcing of information technology impedes the ability of researchers to act within the realm of existing local regulations owing to fundamental differences in the understanding of the right to data protection in various legal systems. In this Opinion article, we address the current opportunities and limitations of cloud computing and highlight the responsible use of federated and hybrid clouds that are set up between public and private partners as an adequate solution for genetics and genomics research in Europe, and under certain conditions between Europe and international partners. This approach could represent a sensible middle ground between fragmented individual solutions and a "one-size-fits-all" approach.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 32 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 77 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 15%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 14 18%
Unknown 14 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 22%
Computer Science 16 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 13 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,550,995
of 21,321,193 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#345
of 1,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,338
of 285,268 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,193 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,354 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,268 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them