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Association between the docosahexaenoic acid to arachidonic acid ratio and acute coronary syndrome: a multicenter observational study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, July 2016
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Title
Association between the docosahexaenoic acid to arachidonic acid ratio and acute coronary syndrome: a multicenter observational study
Published in
BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12872-016-0299-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuji Nishizaki, Kazunori Shimada, Shigemasa Tani, Takayuki Ogawa, Jiro Ando, Masao Takahashi, Masato Yamamoto, Tomohiro Shinozaki, Tetsuro Miyazaki, Katsumi Miyauchi, Ken Nagao, Atsushi Hirayama, Michihiro Yoshimura, Issei Komuro, Ryozo Nagai, Hiroyuki Daida

Abstract

A low eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to arachidonic acid (AA) ratio is a known risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, the association between the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to AA ratio and ACS remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the association between the DHA/AA ratio and ACS by patient characteristics. We enrolled 1733 patients and evaluated the serum levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in 5 cardiology departments in a metropolitan area of Japan. We assessed the relationship between the DHA/AA ratio (median cut-off value: 0.903) and ACS according to the following 10 subgroups: sex, age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking history, family history of ischemic heart disease, chronic kidney disease, obesity, and history of coronary revascularization. Interaction tests in the 10 subgroup analyses revealed a significant difference for adjusted log odds ratios between male and females (p = 0.01), and those with and without hypertension (p = 0.06). Especially in the subgroup based on sex difference, a high DHA/AA ratio was significantly associated with a low risk of ACS among men (adjusted odds ratio = 0.389; 95 % confidence interval: 0.211-0.716). In contrast, a reverse association was found among women, although this was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio = 3.820; 95 % confidence interval: 0.718-20.325). The association between the DHA/AA ratio and ACS differed by clinical characteristic. Notably, patients with a low DHA/AA ratio had a higher risk of ACS than those with a high DHA/AA ratio, and this was significant for men in particular.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 10 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 21%
Psychology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 15 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,125,130
of 11,400,239 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#501
of 717 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,279
of 263,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cardiovascular Disorders
#23
of 32 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 717 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.