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Higher BMI is associated with reduced brain volume in heart failure

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#34 of 182)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Higher BMI is associated with reduced brain volume in heart failure
Published in
BMC Obesity, February 2014
DOI 10.1186/2052-9538-1-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael L Alosco, Adam M Brickman, Mary Beth Spitznagel, Atul Narkhede, Erica Y Griffith, Naftali Raz, Ronald Cohen, Lawrence H Sweet, Lisa H Colbert, Richard Josephson, Joel Hughes, Jim Rosneck, John Gunstad

Abstract

Heart failure (HF) patients are at risk for structural brain changes due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Past work shows obesity is linked with reduced cerebral blood flow and associated with brain atrophy in healthy individuals, although its effects on the brain in HF are unclear. This study examined the association among body mass index (BMI), cerebral perfusion, and brain volume in HF patients. Eighty HF patients underwent transcranial Doppler sonography to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity of the middle cerebral artery (CBF-V of the MCA) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify total brain, total and subcortical gray matter, white matter volume, and white matter hyperintensities. Body mass index (BMI) operationalized weight status. Nearly 45% of HF patients exhibited a BMI consistent with obesity. Regression analyses adjusting for medical variables, demographic characteristics, and CBF-V of the MCA, showed increased BMI was associated with reduced white matter volume (p <.05). BMI also interacted with cerebral perfusion to impact total gray matter volume, but this pattern did not emerge for any other MRI indices (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest increased BMI negatively affects brain volume in HF, and higher BMI interacts with cerebral perfusion to impact gray matter volume. The mechanisms for these findings remain unclear and likely involve multiple physiological processes. Prospective studies are needed to elucidate the exact pattern and rates of brain changes in obese HF persons.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Austria 1 3%
Unknown 32 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 12%
Professor 4 12%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 9 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Psychology 4 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2014.
All research outputs
#1,532,420
of 14,054,251 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#34
of 182 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,389
of 188,174 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,054,251 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 182 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,174 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them