↓ Skip to main content

MyD88-dependent pro-interleukin-1β induction in dendritic cells exposed to food-grade synthetic amorphous silica

Overview of attention for article published in Particle and Fibre Toxicology, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 553)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
MyD88-dependent pro-interleukin-1β induction in dendritic cells exposed to food-grade synthetic amorphous silica
Published in
Particle and Fibre Toxicology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12989-017-0202-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hans Christian Winkler, Julian Kornprobst, Peter Wick, Lea Maria von Moos, Ioannis Trantakis, Elisabeth Maria Schraner, Barbara Bathke, Hubertus Hochrein, Mark Suter, Hanspeter Naegeli

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized first-line sensors of foreign materials invading the organism. These sentinel cells rely on pattern recognition receptors such as Nod-like or Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to launch immune reactions against pathogens, but also to mediate tolerance to self-antigens and, in the intestinal milieu, to nutrients and commensals. Since inappropriate DC activation contributes to inflammatory diseases and immunopathologies, a key question in the evaluation of orally ingested nanomaterials is whether their contact with DCs in the intestinal mucosa disrupts this delicate homeostatic balance between pathogen defense and tolerance. Here, we generated steady-state DCs by incubating hematopoietic progenitors with feline McDonough sarcoma-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and used the resulting immature DCs to test potential biological responses against food-grade synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) representing a common nanomaterial generally thought to be safe. Interaction of immature and unprimed DCs with food-grade SAS particles and their internalization by endocytic uptake fails to elicit cytotoxicity and the release of interleukin (IL)-1α or tumor necrosis factor-α, which were identified as master regulators of acute inflammation in lung-related studies. However, the display of maturation markers on the cell surface shows that SAS particles activate completely immature DCs. Also, the endocytic uptake of SAS particles into these steady-state DCs leads to induction of the pro-IL-1β precursor, subsequently cleaved by the inflammasome to secrete mature IL-1β. In contrast, neither pro-IL-1β induction nor mature IL-1β secretion occurs upon internalization of TiO2 or FePO4 nanoparticles. The pro-IL-1β induction is suppressed by pharmacologic inhibitors of endosomal TLR activation or by genetic ablation of MyD88, a downstream adapter of TLR pathways, indicating that endosomal pattern recognition is responsible for the observed cytokine response to food-grade SAS particles. Our results unexpectedly show that food-grade SAS particles are able to directly initiate the endosomal MyD88-dependent pathogen pattern recognition and signaling pathway in steady-state DCs. The ensuing activation of immature DCs with de novo induction of pro-IL-1β implies that the currently massive use of SAS particles as food additive should be reconsidered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 35%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 8%
Chemistry 2 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 7 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 100. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2018.
All research outputs
#334,724
of 22,062,456 outputs
Outputs from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#15
of 553 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,968
of 287,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Particle and Fibre Toxicology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,062,456 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 553 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them