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Ischemia modified albumin increase indicating cardiac damage after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, February 2014
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Title
Ischemia modified albumin increase indicating cardiac damage after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, February 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2202-15-33
Pubmed ID
Authors

Şerefden Açıkgöz, Nurullah Edebali, Figen Barut, Murat Can, İshak Özel Tekin, Çağatay Büyükuysal, Bektaş Açıkgöz

Abstract

Cardiac complications are often developed after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may cause sudden death of the patient. There are reports in the literature addressing ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an early and useful marker in the diagnosis of ischemic heart events. The aim of this study is to evaluate serum IMA by using the albumin cobalt binding (ACB) test in the first, second, and seventh days of experimental SAH in rats.Twenty-eight Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups each consisting of seven animals. These were classified as control group, 1st, 2nd and 7th day SAH groups. SAH was done by transclival basilar artery puncture. Blood samples were collected under anesthesia from the left ventricles of the heart using the cardiac puncture method for IMA measurement. Histopathological examinations were performed on the heart and lung tissues. Albumin with by colorimetric, creatine kinase (CK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined on an automatic analyser using the enzymatic method. IMA using by ACB test was detected with spectrophotometer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 15%
Unspecified 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Professor 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Unknown 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 54%
Mathematics 1 8%
Unspecified 1 8%
Chemistry 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 February 2014.
All research outputs
#2,669,426
of 5,036,385 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#373
of 679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,420
of 123,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#21
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,385 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 679 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,759 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.