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Policy content and stakeholder network analysis for infant and young child feeding in Bangladesh

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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160 Mendeley
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Title
Policy content and stakeholder network analysis for infant and young child feeding in Bangladesh
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4338-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabrina Rasheed, Swapan Kumar Roy, Susmita Das, Syeda Nafisa Chowdhury, Mohammad Iqbal, Syeda Mahsina Akter, Khurshid Jahan, Shahadat Uddin, Anne Marie Thow

Abstract

Appropriate infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices are essential for nutrition of infants and young children. Bangladesh has one of the highest levels of malnutrition globally along with sub-optimal IYCF practices. A supportive policy environment is essential to ensure that effective IYCF interventions are scaled up. The objectives of our study were to assess the support for IYCF in the national policy environment through policy analysis and stakeholder analysis and in so doing identify opportunities to strengthen the policy environment. We used a matrix developed by SAIFRN (the South Asian Infant Feeding Research Network) to systematically identify supportive national policies, plans and guidelines for IYCF. We adapted narrative synthesis and descriptive approaches to analyze policy content, based on four themes with a focus on support for mothers. We conducted three Net-Map interviews to identify stakeholders who influenced the policies and programs related to IYCF. We identified 19 national policy documents relevant to IYCF. Overall, there was good level of support for IYCF practices at policy level - particularly regarding general support for IYCF and provision of information to mothers - but these were not consistently supported at implementation level, particularly regarding specificity and population coverage. We identified gaps regarding the training of health workers, capacity building, the monitoring and targeting of vulnerable mothers and providing an enabling environment to mothers, specifically with respect to maternity leave for working women. Urban populations and providers outside the public sector remained uncovered by policy. Our stakeholder analysis identified government entities such as the National Nutrition Service, as the most influential in terms of both technical and funding support as they had the mandate for formulation and implementation of policies and national programs. Stakeholders from different sectors played important roles, demonstrating the salience of IYCF. Although there is strong supportive policy environment for IYCF, it is important that policies cover all populations. Our analysis indicated that opportunities to strengthen the policy environment include: expanding population coverage, increasing inter-sector coordination, improving translation of policy objectives to implementation-level documents, and the engagement of non-public sectors. In addition, we recommend explicit strategies to engage diverse stakeholders in the formulation and implementation of IYCF policies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 160 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 17%
Researcher 23 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 9%
Student > Bachelor 13 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 46 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 35 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 21%
Social Sciences 18 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 4%
Psychology 4 3%
Other 12 8%
Unknown 51 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,672,548
of 12,354,690 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,064
of 8,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,505
of 266,837 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#96
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,354,690 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,355 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,837 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.