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Differential methylation at MHC in CD4+ T cells is associated with multiple sclerosis independently of HLA-DRB1

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, July 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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3 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Differential methylation at MHC in CD4+ T cells is associated with multiple sclerosis independently of HLA-DRB1
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0371-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vicki E. Maltby, Rodney A. Lea, Katherine A. Sanders, Nicole White, Miles C. Benton, Rodney J. Scott, Jeannette Lechner-Scott

Abstract

Although many genetic variants have been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk, they do not explain all the disease risk and there remains uncertainty as to how these variants contribute to disease. DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that can influence gene expression and has the potential to mediate the effects of environmental factors on MS. In a previous study, we found a differentially methylation region (DMR) at MHC HLA-DRB1 that was associated within relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) patients in CD4(+) T cells. This study aimed to confirm this earlier finding in an independent RRMS cohort of treatment-naïve female patients. Total genomic DNA was extracted from CD4(+) T cells of 28 female RRMS and 22 age-matched healthy controls subjects. DNA was bisulfite-converted and hybridised to Illumina 450K arrays. Beta values for all CpGs were analysed using the DMPFinder function in the MINFI program, and a follow-up prioritisation process was applied to identify the most robust MS-associated DMRs. This study confirmed our previous findings of a hypomethylated DMR at HLA-DRB1 and a hypermethylated DMR at HLA-DRB5 in this RRMS patient cohort. In addition, we identified a large independent DMR at MHC, whereby 11 CpGs in RNF39 were hypermethylated in MS cases compared to controls (max. ∆beta = 0.19, P = 2.1 × 10(-4)). We did not find evidence that SNP genotype was influencing the DMR in this cohort. A smaller MHC DMR was also identified at HCG4B, and two non-MHC DMRs at PM20D1 on chr1 and ERICH1 on chr8 were also identified. The findings from this study confirm our previous results of a DMR at HLA-DRB1 and also suggest hypermethylation in an independent MHC locus, RNF39, is associated with MS. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of epigenetic factors at the MHC locus in MS independent of treatment, age and sex. Prospective studies are now required to discern whether methylation at MHC is involved in influencing risk of disease onset or whether the disease itself has altered the methylation profile.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 26%
Researcher 6 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 11%
Psychology 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2020.
All research outputs
#2,257,199
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#145
of 941 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,383
of 273,672 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 941 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,672 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.