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Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Emergency Medicine, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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22 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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150 Mendeley
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Title
Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis
Published in
International Journal of Emergency Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12245-017-0149-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Anne Calder, George Mastoras, Mitra Rahimpour, Benjamin Sohmer, Brian Weitzman, A. Adam Cwinn, Tara Hobin, Avi Parush

Abstract

In order to enhance patient safety during resuscitation of critically ill patients, we need to optimize team communication and enhance team situational awareness but little is known about resuscitation team communication patterns. The objective of this study is to understand how teams communicate during resuscitation; specifically to assess for a shared mental model (organized understanding of a team's relationships) and information needs. We triangulated 3 methods to evaluate resuscitation team communication at a tertiary care academic trauma center: (1) interviews; (2) simulated resuscitation observations; (3) live resuscitation observations. We interviewed 18 resuscitation team members about shared mental models, roles and goals of team members and procedural expectations. We observed 30 simulated resuscitation video recordings and documented the timing, source and destination of communication and the information category. We observed 12 live resuscitations in the emergency department and recorded baseline characteristics of the type of resuscitations, nature of teams present and type and content of information exchanges. The data were analyzed using a qualitative communication analysis method. We found that resuscitation team members described a shared mental model. Respondents understood the roles and goals of each team member in order to provide rapid, efficient and life-saving care with an overall need for situational awareness. The information flow described in the interviews was reflected during the simulated and live resuscitations with the most responsible physician and charting nurse being central to team communication. We consolidated communicated information into six categories: (1) time; (2) patient status; (3) patient history; (4) interventions; (5) assistance and consultations; 6) team members present. Resuscitation team members expressed a shared mental model and prioritized situational awareness. Our findings support a need for cognitive aids to enhance team communication during resuscitations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 150 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 22%
Student > Bachelor 20 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 12%
Researcher 12 8%
Other 9 6%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 34 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 22%
Psychology 20 13%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 5%
Engineering 6 4%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 37 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2017.
All research outputs
#2,093,694
of 22,509,254 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Emergency Medicine
#65
of 598 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,606
of 285,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Emergency Medicine
#2
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,509,254 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 598 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 285,037 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.