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Cannibalism and activity rate in larval damselflies increase along a latitudinal gradient as a consequence of time constraints

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Cannibalism and activity rate in larval damselflies increase along a latitudinal gradient as a consequence of time constraints
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1010-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Szymon Sniegula, Maria J. Golab, Frank Johansson

Abstract

Predation is ubiquitous in nature. One form of predation is cannibalism, which is affected by many factors such as size structure and resource density. However, cannibalism may also be influenced by abiotic factors such as seasonal time constraints. Since time constraints are greater at high latitudes, cannibalism could be stronger at such latitudes, but we know next to nothing about latitudinal variation in cannibalism. In this study, we examined cannibalism and activity in larvae of the damselfly Lestes sponsa along a latitudinal gradient across Europe. We did this by raising larvae from the egg stage at different temperatures and photoperiods corresponding to different latitudes. We found that the more seasonally time-constrained populations in northern latitudes and individuals subjected to greater seasonal time constraints exhibited a higher level of cannibalism. We also found that activity was higher at north latitude conditions, and thus correlated with cannibalism, suggesting that this behaviour mediates higher levels of cannibalism in time-constrained animals. Our results go counter to the classical latitude-predation pattern which predicts higher predation at lower latitudes, since we found that predation was stronger at higher latitudes. The differences in cannibalism might have implications for population dynamics along the latitudinal gradients, but further experiments are needed to explore this.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 18%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 18%
Researcher 3 18%
Professor 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 3 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 47%
Environmental Science 2 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 12%
Psychology 1 6%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 December 2018.
All research outputs
#7,061,766
of 14,064,191 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,528
of 2,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,262
of 266,702 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,064,191 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,571 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,702 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them