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Towards evidence based strength training: a comparison of muscle forces during deadlifts, goodmornings and split squats

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 464)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
58 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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149 Mendeley
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Title
Towards evidence based strength training: a comparison of muscle forces during deadlifts, goodmornings and split squats
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13102-017-0077-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Florian Schellenberg, William R. Taylor, Silvio Lorenzetti

Abstract

To ensure an efficient and targeted adaptation with low injury risk during strength exercises, knowledge of the participant specific internal loading conditions is essential. The goal of this study was to calculate the lower limb muscles forces during the strength exercises deadlifts, goodmornings and splits squats by means of musculoskeletal simulation. 11 participants were assessed performing 10 different variations of split squats by varying the step length as well as the maximal frontal tibia angle, and 13 participants were measured performing deadlift and goodmorning exercises. Using individualised musculoskeletal models, forces of the Quadriceps (four parts), Hamstrings (four parts) and m. gluteus maximus (three parts) were computed. Deadlifts resulted highest loading for the Quadriceps, especially for the vasti (18-34 N/kg), but not for the rectus femoris (8-10 N/kg), which exhibited its greatest loading during split squats (13-27 N/kg) in the rear limb. Hamstrings were loaded isometrically during goodmornings but dynamically during deadlifts. For the m. gluteus maximus, the highest loading was observed during split squats in the front limb (up to 25 N/kg), while deadlifts produced increasingly, large loading over large ranges of motion in hip and knee. Acting muscle forces vary between exercises, execution form and joint angle. For all examined muscles, deadlifts produced considerable loading over large ranges of motion, while split squats seem to be highly dependent upon exercise variation. This study provides key information to design strength-training programs with respect to loading conditions and ranges of motion of lower extremity muscles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 37 25%
Student > Master 33 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Researcher 9 6%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 29 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 55 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 11%
Engineering 6 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 35 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2022.
All research outputs
#669,238
of 21,907,648 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#24
of 464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,490
of 287,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,907,648 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 464 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them