↓ Skip to main content

A multilocus phylogeny reveals deep lineages within African galagids (Primates: Galagidae)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
65 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A multilocus phylogeny reveals deep lineages within African galagids (Primates: Galagidae)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2148-14-72
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luca Pozzi, Todd R Disotell, Judith C Masters

Abstract

Bushbabies (Galagidae) are among the most morphologically cryptic of all primates and their diversity and relationships are some of the most longstanding problems in primatology. Our knowledge of galagid evolutionary history has been limited by a lack of appropriate molecular data and a paucity of fossils. Most phylogenetic studies have produced conflicting results for many clades, and even the relationships among genera remain uncertain. To clarify galagid evolutionary history, we assembled the largest molecular dataset for galagos to date by sequencing 27 independent loci. We inferred phylogenetic relationships using concatenated maximum-likelihood and Bayesian analyses, and also coalescent-based species tree methods to account for gene tree heterogeneity due to incomplete lineage sorting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 63 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 17%
Researcher 9 14%
Student > Postgraduate 9 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Other 11 17%
Unknown 6 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 11%
Environmental Science 4 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 5%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 7 11%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2019.
All research outputs
#1,887,110
of 16,343,452 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#581
of 2,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,459
of 194,294 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,343,452 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,768 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,294 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them