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Malaria epidemiology in low-endemicity areas of the northern coast of Ecuador: high prevalence of asymptomatic infections

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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96 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria epidemiology in low-endemicity areas of the northern coast of Ecuador: high prevalence of asymptomatic infections
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1947-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabián E. Sáenz, Andrea Arévalo-Cortés, Gabriela Valenzuela, Andrés F. Vallejo, Angélica Castellanos, Andrea C. Poveda-Loayza, Juan B. Gutierrez, Alvaro Alvarez, Yi Heng Yan, Yoldy Benavides, Luis Enrique Castro, Myriam Arévalo-Herrera, Sócrates Herrera

Abstract

The recent scale-up in malaria control measures in Latin America has resulted in a significant decrease in the number of reported cases in several countries including Ecuador, where it presented a low malaria incidence in recent years (558 reported cases in 2015) with occasional outbreaks of both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in the coastal and Amazonian regions. This success in malaria control in recent years has led Ecuador to transition its malaria policy from control to elimination. This study evaluated the general knowledge, attitude and practices (KAP) about malaria, as well as its prevalence in four communities of an endemic area in northwest Ecuador. A total of 258 interviews to assess KAP in the community indicated that most people in the study area have a basic knowledge about the disease but did not use to contribute to its control. Six hundred and forty-eight blood samples were collected and analysed by thick blood smear and real-time PCR. In addition, the distribution of the infections was mapped in the study communities. Although, no parasites were found by microscopy, by PCR the total malaria prevalence was 7.5% (6.9% P. vivax and 0.6% P. falciparum), much higher than expected and comparable to that reported in endemic areas of neighbouring countries with higher malaria transmission. Serology using ELISA and immunofluorescence indicated 27% respondents for P. vivax and 22% respondents for P. falciparum. Results suggest that despite a great malaria reduction in Ecuador, transition from control to elimination would demand further improvement in malaria diagnostics, including active case detection to identify and treat parasite asymptomatic carriers, as well as community participation in its elimination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 96 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 18%
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Student > Master 12 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 24 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 7%
Environmental Science 6 6%
Computer Science 3 3%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 29 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 August 2017.
All research outputs
#1,828,425
of 11,618,931 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#525
of 3,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,185
of 265,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#31
of 114 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,618,931 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,422 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,433 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 114 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.