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Perceived stress, unhealthy eating behaviors, and severe obesity in low-income women

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
76 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
318 Mendeley
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Title
Perceived stress, unhealthy eating behaviors, and severe obesity in low-income women
Published in
Nutrition Journal, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12937-015-0110-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrea S. Richardson, Joanne E. Arsenault, Sheryl C. Cates, Mary K. Muth

Abstract

Stress has been associated with poor eating behaviors and diet quality, as well as high body mass index (BMI). Low-income women may be particularly vulnerable to stress and severe obesity. Yet it is unknown how stress increases the risk of severe obesity through disordered eating behaviors and poor diet quality or through mechanisms independent of diet. We examined cross-sectional data from women (n = 101) with a child enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in Cumberland County, North Carolina (spring 2012). We collected measured heights and weights to calculate BMI. Using structural equation modeling, we differentiated pathways from stress to weight status: (1) indirectly through eating behaviors (cognitive restraint, emotional eating, and uncontrolled eating) and diet quality, which we examined with the Healthy Eating Index 2010 and 24-h dietary recalls, and (2) directly through possible unmeasured risk factors independent of diet. The analysis controlled for race/ethnicity, income, age, whether the dietary recall day was typical, and whether the respondent completed one or two 24-h dietary recalls. Perceived stress was positively associated with uncontrolled eating (β = 0.38, p < 0.001) and emotional eating (β = 0.50, p < 0.001). However, higher stress was not associated with weight status through eating behaviors and diet quality. Independent of eating behaviors and diet quality, stress was positively associated with severe obesity (β = 0.26, p = 0.007). Improving stress coping strategies for low-income women may improve eating behaviors and reduce severe obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 318 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Pakistan 1 <1%
Unknown 317 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 80 25%
Student > Master 60 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 7%
Researcher 15 5%
Other 49 15%
Unknown 56 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 66 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 54 17%
Psychology 46 14%
Social Sciences 21 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 6%
Other 39 12%
Unknown 74 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 38. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2019.
All research outputs
#660,137
of 17,365,229 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#211
of 1,289 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,306
of 277,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,365,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,289 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them