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Acculturation, Depression, and Smoking Cessation: a trajectory pattern recognition approach

Overview of attention for article published in Tobacco Induced Diseases, July 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
Acculturation, Depression, and Smoking Cessation: a trajectory pattern recognition approach
Published in
Tobacco Induced Diseases, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12971-017-0135-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sun S Kim, Hua Fang, Kunsook Bernstein, Zhaoyang Zhang, Joseph DiFranza, Douglas Ziedonis, Jeroan Allison

Abstract

Korean Americans are known for a high smoking prevalence within the Asian American population. This study examined the effects of acculturation and depression on Korean Americans' smoking cessation and abstinence. This is a secondary data analysis of a smoking cessation study that implemented eight weekly individualized counseling sessions of a culturally adapted cessation intervention for the treatment arm and a standard cognitive behavioral therapy for the comparison arm. Both arms also received nicotine patches for 8 weeks. A newly developed non-parametric trajectory pattern recognition model (MI-Fuzzy) was used to identify cognitive and behavioral response patterns to a smoking cessation intervention among 97 Korean American smokers (81 men and 16 women). Three distinctive response patterns were revealed: (a) Culturally Adapted (CA), since all identified members received the culturally adapted intervention; (b) More Bicultural (MB), for having higher scores of bicultural acculturation; and (c) Less Bicultural (LB), for having lower scores of bicultural acculturation. The CA smokers were those from the treatment arm, while MB and LB groups were from the comparison arm. The LB group differed in depression from the CA and MB groups and no difference was found between the CA and MB groups. Although depression did not directly affect 12-month prolonged abstinence, the LB group was most depressed and achieved the lowest rate of abstinence (LB: 1.03%; MB: 5.15%; CA: 21.65%). A culturally adaptive intervention should target Korean American smokers with a high level of depression and a low level of biculturalism to assist in their smoking cessation. NCT01091363. Registered 21 March 2010.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 15%
Lecturer 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Professor 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 7 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Unspecified 2 7%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 6 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,811,822
of 13,586,932 outputs
Outputs from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#163
of 195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,526
of 266,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Tobacco Induced Diseases
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,586,932 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 195 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,851 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.