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Health and wealth in Mesoamerica: findings from Salud Mesomérica 2015

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

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20 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Health and wealth in Mesoamerica: findings from Salud Mesomérica 2015
Published in
BMC Medicine, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0393-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ali H. Mokdad, Marielle C. Gagnier, K. Ellicott Colson, Paola Zúñiga-Brenes, Diego Ríos-Zertuche, Annie Haakenstad, Erin B. Palmisano, Brent W. Anderson, Sima S. Desai, Catherine W. Gillespie, Tasha Murphy, Paria Naghavi, Jennifer Nelson, Dharani Ranganathan, Alexandra Schaefer, Gulnoza Usmanova, Shelley Wilson, Bernardo Hernandez, Rafael Lozano, Emma Iriarte

Abstract

Individual income and poverty are associated with poor health outcomes. The poor face unique challenges related to access, education, financial capacity, environmental effects, and other factors that threaten their health outcomes. We examined the variation in the health outcomes and health behaviors among the poorest quintile in eight countries of Mesoamerica using data from the Salud Mesomérica 2015 baseline household surveys. We used multivariable logistic regression to measure the association between delivering a child in a health facility and select household and maternal characteristics, including education and measures of wealth. Health indicators varied greatly between geographic segments. Controlling for other demographic characteristics, women with at least secondary education were more likely to have an in-facility delivery compared to women who had not attended school (OR: 3.20, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 2.56-3.99, respectively). Similarly, women from households with the highest expenditure were more likely to deliver in a health facility compared to those from the lowest expenditure households (OR 3.06, 95 % CI: 2.43-3.85). Household assets did not impact these associations. Moreover, we found that commonly-used definitions of poverty do not align with the disparities in health outcomes observed in these communities. Although poverty measured by expenditure or wealth is associated with health disparities or health outcomes, a composite indicator of health poverty based on coverage is more likely to focus attention on health problems and solutions. Our findings call for the public health community to define poverty by health coverage measures rather than income or wealth. Such a health-poverty metric is more likely to generate attention and mobilize targeted action by the health communities than our current definition of poverty.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 41 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 26%
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Lecturer 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 21%
Social Sciences 8 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 8 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2015.
All research outputs
#1,782,082
of 16,523,892 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,263
of 2,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,142
of 273,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,523,892 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 38.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,394 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them