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Feasibility of a computer-assisted social network motivational interviewing intervention for substance use and HIV risk behaviors for housing first residents

Overview of attention for article published in Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
Feasibility of a computer-assisted social network motivational interviewing intervention for substance use and HIV risk behaviors for housing first residents
Published in
Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, September 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13722-016-0061-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Chan Osilla, David P. Kennedy, Sarah B. Hunter, Ervant Maksabedian

Abstract

Social networks play positive and negative roles in the lives of homeless people influencing their alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) and HIV risk behaviors. We developed a four-session computer-assisted social network motivational interviewing intervention for homeless adults transitioning into housing. We examined the acceptability of the intervention among staff and residents at an organization that provides permanent supportive housing through iterative rounds of beta testing. Staff were 3 men and 3 women who were residential support staff (i.e., case managers and administrators). Residents were 8 men (7 African American, 1 Hispanic) and 3 women (2 African American, 1 Hispanic) who had histories of AOD and HIV risk behaviors. We conducted a focus group with staff who gave input on how to improve the delivery of the intervention to enhance understanding and receptivity among new residents. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews and collected self-report satisfaction data from residents. Three themes emerged over the course of the resident interviews. Residents reported that the intervention was helpful in discussing their social network, that seeing the visualizations was more impactful than just talking about their network, and that the intervention prompted thoughts about changing their AOD use and HIV risk networks. This study is the first of its kind that has developed, with input from Housing First staff and residents, a motivational interviewing intervention that targets both the structure and composition of one's social network. These results suggest that providing visual network feedback with a guided motivational interviewing discussion is a promising approach to supporting network change. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02140359.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 17%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 16 22%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Social Sciences 13 18%
Psychology 11 15%
Computer Science 4 6%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2016.
All research outputs
#2,115,246
of 8,518,079 outputs
Outputs from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#70
of 167 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,736
of 235,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Addiction Science & Clinical Practice
#7
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,518,079 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 167 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,099 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.