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Study protocol: Imaging brain development in the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (iCATS)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, April 2014
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
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Title
Study protocol: Imaging brain development in the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study (iCATS)
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, April 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2431-14-115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julian G Simmons, Sarah L Whittle, George C Patton, Paul Dudgeon, Craig Olsson, Michelle L Byrne, Lisa K Mundy, Marc L Seal, Nicholas B Allen

Abstract

Puberty is a critical developmental phase in physical, reproductive and socio-emotional maturation that is associated with the period of peak onset for psychopathology. Puberty also drives significant changes in brain development and function. Research to date has focused on gonadarche, driven by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and yet increasing evidence suggests that the earlier pubertal stage of adrenarche, driven by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, may play a critical role in both brain development and increased risk for disorder. We have established a unique cohort of children who differ in their exposure to adrenarcheal hormones. This presents a unique opportunity to examine the influence of adrenarcheal timing on brain structural and functional development, and subsequent health outcomes. The primary objective of the study is to explore the hypothesis that patterns of structural and functional brain development will mediate the relationship between adrenarcheal timing and indices of affect, self-regulation, and mental health symptoms collected across time (and therefore years of development).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 118 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 25%
Researcher 14 12%
Student > Master 13 11%
Professor 10 8%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Other 21 18%
Unknown 21 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 44 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Neuroscience 12 10%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 30 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2014.
All research outputs
#14,780,011
of 22,754,104 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#1,904
of 2,990 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,065
of 227,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#36
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,754,104 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,990 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,058 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.