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Dietary quality and patterns and non-communicable disease risk of an Indian community in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, August 2015
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Title
Dietary quality and patterns and non-communicable disease risk of an Indian community in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Published in
Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s41043-015-0013-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Naicker, C. S. Venter, U. E. MacIntyre, S. Ellis

Abstract

Limited data exist on the South African Indian diet despite their high prevalence of non-communicable diseases. This study attempted to determine the dietary quality and patterns of an Indian population in KwaZulu-Natal with reference to the high prevalence of non-communicable disease Two-hundred-and-fifty apparently healthy Indians, aged 35-55 years participated in a cross-sectional study where diet was assessed using a validated quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Mean intakes were compared to the World Health Organization goals. Dietary quality was determined by index construction and dietary patterns by factor analysis. The mean daily percentage of energy (%E) from n-3 fatty acids (0.24 %E), dietary fibre (18.4 g/day) and fruit and vegetable intakes (229.4 g/day) were below the World Health Organization goals. Total fat (36.1 %E), polyunsaturated fatty acids (11.8 %E), n-6 fatty acids (11 %E) and free sugars (12.5 %E) exceeded the goals. The means for the deficient index reflected a moderate diet quality whereas, the excess index reflected good diet quality. The Pearson partial correlation coefficients between the deficient index and risk markers were weak whilst, the excess index was inversely correlated with waist circumference for the whole sample. Two factors were identified, based on the percentage of fat that contributed to each food group: factor 1 (meat and fish versus legume and cereal pattern), which accounted for added fat through food preparation; and Factor 2 (nuts and seeds versus sugars and visible fat pattern), which accounted for obvious fat. The medians for waist circumference, blood glucose, cholesterol and triglyceride levels showed significant decreasing trends for factor 1 (p < 0.05). The medians for blood glucose and cholesterol showed significant decreasing trends for factor 2 (p < 0.01). A shortfall of fruit and vegetable, fibre and n-3 fatty acid intake in the diet is highlighted. When assessing the diet quality and patterns, guidance on the prudent use of added fats may lead to a healthier lifestyle reducing the prevalence of non-communicable diseases.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 2 2%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 91 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 8 9%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 17 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 13%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 2%
Other 17 18%
Unknown 26 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,261,955
of 11,566,328 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#212
of 270 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,131
of 265,156 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,566,328 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 270 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,156 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.