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Equine skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise and training: evidence of differential regulation of autophagosomal and mitochondrial components

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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12 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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100 Mendeley
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Title
Equine skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise and training: evidence of differential regulation of autophagosomal and mitochondrial components
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4007-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth Bryan, Beatrice A. McGivney, Gabriella Farries, Paul A. McGettigan, Charlotte L. McGivney, Katie F. Gough, David E. MacHugh, Lisa M. Katz, Emmeline W. Hill

Abstract

A single bout of exercise induces changes in gene expression in skeletal muscle. Regular exercise results in an adaptive response involving changes in muscle architecture and biochemistry, and is an effective way to manage and prevent common human diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disorders and type II diabetes. However, the biomolecular mechanisms underlying such responses still need to be fully elucidated. Here we performed a transcriptome-wide analysis of skeletal muscle tissue in a large cohort of untrained Thoroughbred horses (n = 51) before and after a bout of high-intensity exercise and again after an extended period of training. We hypothesized that regular high-intensity exercise training primes the transcriptome for the demands of high-intensity exercise. An extensive set of genes was observed to be significantly differentially regulated in response to a single bout of high-intensity exercise in the untrained cohort (3241 genes) and following multiple bouts of high-intensity exercise training over a six-month period (3405 genes). Approximately one-third of these genes (1025) and several biological processes related to energy metabolism were common to both the exercise and training responses. We then developed a novel network-based computational analysis pipeline to test the hypothesis that these transcriptional changes also influence the contextual molecular interactome and its dynamics in response to exercise and training. The contextual network analysis identified several important hub genes, including the autophagosomal-related gene GABARAPL1, and dynamic functional modules, including those enriched for mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and V, that were differentially regulated and had their putative interactions 're-wired' in the exercise and/or training responses. Here we have generated for the first time, a comprehensive set of genes that are differentially expressed in Thoroughbred skeletal muscle in response to both exercise and training. These data indicate that consecutive bouts of high-intensity exercise result in a priming of the skeletal muscle transcriptome for the demands of the next exercise bout. Furthermore, this may also lead to an extensive 're-wiring' of the molecular interactome in both exercise and training and include key genes and functional modules related to autophagy and the mitochondrion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 100 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 100 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 30%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 10%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Postgraduate 5 5%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 26 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 27%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 18 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 11%
Sports and Recreations 7 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 2%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 30 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,261,383
of 18,804,592 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,479
of 9,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,586
of 282,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,804,592 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,633 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them