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Availability of a sports dietitian may lead to improved performance and recovery of NCAA division I baseball athletes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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94 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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141 Mendeley
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Title
Availability of a sports dietitian may lead to improved performance and recovery of NCAA division I baseball athletes
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, April 2022
DOI 10.1186/s12970-017-0187-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael V. Hull, Jonathan Neddo, Andrew R. Jagim, Jonathan M. Oliver, Mike Greenwood, Margaret T. Jones

Abstract

The purpose was to survey dietary habits (DH) and nutrient timing (NT) practices of baseball student-athletes (mean ± SD; 20.7 ± 1.4 yr.) from three NCAA Division I institutions, and examine the effect of a sports dietitian (SD) in regard to nutrition practices. Descriptive statistics and Pearson X(2) analyses were run. Responses on 10 DH and 5 NT items differed (p ≤ 0.10) between athletes who sought dietary planning from a SD (n = 36) versus those who consulted a strength and conditioning coach (SCC, n = 42). In regard to DH items, the SD group found it easier to eat before activity (92% vs. 71%, p = 0.03), did not consume fast food (31% vs. 14%, p = 0.02), caffeinated beverages (57% vs. 46%, p = 0.02), or soda (56% vs. 37%, p = 0.10), prepared their own meals more often (86% vs. 73%, p = 0.07), and took daily multi-vitamins (56% vs. 32%, p = 0.02). The SCC group ate more at burger locations (21% vs. 6%, p = 0.02). In regard to NT items, the SD group ate breakfast before training/lifting sessions (67% vs. 37%, p = 0.02), and had post-workout nutrition options provided (61% vs. 27%, p = 0.01). The SCC group reported pre-competition meals of fast food (58% vs. 45%, p = 0.01), and sport coaches who were less aware of healthy food options (39% vs. 65%, p = 0.05). The SD is as a valuable asset to an intercollegiate athletics program. In the current study, athletes from the SD group consumed less high calorie/low nutrient dense items, ate before exercise, and consumed healthier options post-exercise. The presence of a SD was linked to provision of healthier food options during team trips. The evidence-based eating strategies and dietary plan provided by a SD may lead to improved performance and recovery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 94 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 141 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 23%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 8%
Researcher 9 6%
Student > Postgraduate 7 5%
Other 20 14%
Unknown 42 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 27 19%
Sports and Recreations 25 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 5%
Unspecified 5 4%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 49 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2018.
All research outputs
#488,816
of 22,997,544 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#152
of 887 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,445
of 439,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#148
of 851 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,997,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 887 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 58.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 439,980 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 851 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.