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Temporal and spatial distribution characteristics in the natural plague foci of Chinese Mongolian gerbils based on spatial autocorrelation

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, August 2017
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2 tweeters

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Temporal and spatial distribution characteristics in the natural plague foci of Chinese Mongolian gerbils based on spatial autocorrelation
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40249-017-0338-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hai-Wen Du, Yong Wang, Da-Fang Zhuang, Xiao-San Jiang

Abstract

The nest flea index of Meriones unguiculatus is a critical indicator for the prevention and control of plague, which can be used not only to detect the spatial and temporal distributions of Meriones unguiculatus, but also to reveal its cluster rule. This research detected the temporal and spatial distribution characteristics of the plague natural foci of Mongolian gerbils by body flea index from 2005 to 2014, in order to predict plague outbreaks. Global spatial autocorrelation was used to describe the entire spatial distribution pattern of the body flea index in the natural plague foci of typical Chinese Mongolian gerbils. Cluster and outlier analysis and hot spot analysis were also used to detect the intensity of clusters based on geographic information system methods. The quantity of M. unguiculatus nest fleas in the sentinel surveillance sites from 2005 to 2014 and host density data of the study area from 2005 to 2010 used in this study were provided by Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. The epidemic focus regions of the Mongolian gerbils remain the same as the hot spot regions relating to the body flea index. High clustering areas possess a similar pattern as the distribution pattern of the body flea index indicating that the transmission risk of plague is relatively high. In terms of time series, the area of the epidemic focus gradually increased from 2005 to 2007, declined rapidly in 2008 and 2009, and then decreased slowly and began trending towards stability from 2009 to 2014. For the spatial change, the epidemic focus regions began moving northward from the southwest epidemic focus of the Mongolian gerbils from 2005 to 2007, and then moved from north to south in 2007 and 2008. The body flea index of Chinese gerbil foci reveals significant spatial and temporal aggregation characteristics through the employing of spatial autocorrelation. The diversity of temporary and spatial distribution is mainly affected by seasonal variation, the human activity and natural factors.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 30%
Researcher 6 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Lecturer 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 15%
Computer Science 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 11%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Other 6 22%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2017.
All research outputs
#6,641,947
of 11,599,579 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#200
of 399 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,664
of 265,743 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#9
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,599,579 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 399 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.