↓ Skip to main content

Sex chromosomes drive gene expression and regulatory dimorphisms in mouse embryonic stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Biology of Sex Differences, August 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Sex chromosomes drive gene expression and regulatory dimorphisms in mouse embryonic stem cells
Published in
Biology of Sex Differences, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13293-017-0150-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachael J. Werner, Bryant M. Schultz, Jacklyn M. Huhn, Jaroslav Jelinek, Jozef Madzo, Nora Engel

Abstract

Pre-implantation embryos exhibit sexual dimorphisms in both primates and rodents. To determine whether these differences reflected sex-biased expression patterns, we generated transcriptome profiles for six 40,XX, six 40,XY, and two 39,X mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells by RNA sequencing. We found hundreds of coding and non-coding RNAs that were differentially expressed between male and female cells. Surprisingly, the majority of these were autosomal and included RNA encoding transcription and epigenetic and chromatin remodeling factors. We showed differential Prdm14-responsive enhancer activity in male and female cells, correlating with the sex-specific levels of Prdm14 expression. This is the first time sex-specific enhancer activity in ES cells has been reported. Evaluation of X-linked gene expression patterns between our XX and XY lines revealed four distinct categories: (1) genes showing 2-fold greater expression in the female cells; (2) a set of genes with expression levels well above 2-fold in female cells; (3) genes with equivalent RNA levels in male and female cells; and strikingly, (4) a small number of genes with higher expression in the XY lines. Further evaluation of autosomal gene expression revealed differential expression of imprinted loci, despite appropriate parent-of-origin patterns. The 39,X lines aligned closely with the XY cells and provided insights into potential regulation of genes associated with Turner syndrome in humans. Moreover, inclusion of the 39,X lines permitted three-way comparisons, delineating X and Y chromosome-dependent patterns. Overall, our results support the role of the sex chromosomes in establishing sex-specific networks early in embryonic development and provide insights into effects of sex chromosome aneuploidies originating at those stages.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 24%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Master 6 12%
Professor 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 24%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,384,149
of 13,104,802 outputs
Outputs from Biology of Sex Differences
#153
of 234 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,821
of 267,380 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology of Sex Differences
#4
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,104,802 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 234 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,380 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.