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Gender differentials in readiness and use of mHealth services in a rural area of Bangladesh

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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19 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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138 Mendeley
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Title
Gender differentials in readiness and use of mHealth services in a rural area of Bangladesh
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2523-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fatema Khatun, Anita E. Heywood, Syed Manzoor Ahmed Hanifi, M. Shafiqur Rahman, Pradeep K. Ray, Siaw-Teng Liaw, Abbas Bhuiya

Abstract

Traditional gender roles result in women lagging behind men in the use of modern technologies, especially in developing countries. Although there is rapid uptake of mobile phone use in Bangladesh, investigation of gender differences in the ownership, access and use of mobile phones in general and mHealth in particular has been limited. This paper presents gender differentials in the ownership of mobile phones and knowledge of available mHealth services in a rural area of Bangladesh. We interviewed 4915 randomly selected respondents aged 18 years and above. Associations between gender and knowledge of available mHealth services, use of existing mHealth services and intentions to use mHealth services in the future were examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for the effect of categorised covariates. Of the 4915 respondents to the survey, 61.8% of men (1213/1964) and 34.4% of women (1015/2951) owned a mobile phone. For men, mobile phone ownership was highest among those aged 18-29 years (n = 663, 76.3%), and for women among those aged 30-39 years (n = 825, 44.7%). A higher proportion of men owned phones compared to women, irrespective of socioeconomic status (SES) as indicated by asset index (p < 0.001). Although mobile phone ownership on average was lower among women, they were more likely to share their mobile phone with their family members (19.7%) compared to men (11.6%, p < 0.001). Greater number of men were more likely to be aware of the use of mobile phones for healthcare compared to women (38.5% vs 26.5%, p < 0.001). Knowledge about available mHealth services was lower among women than men; however, intention to use mHealth services in the future was high for both genders, irrespective of age, education and socioeconomic status. Compared to men, women are less likely to own a mobile phone and less aware of available mHealth services, despite high intention to use mHealth among both genders. To optimise the use of mHealth services and to achieve equity of use, uptake strategies should target women, with a focus on the poorer and less educated groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 138 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 17%
Student > Bachelor 21 15%
Researcher 15 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 26 19%
Unknown 35 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 25 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 14%
Social Sciences 15 11%
Computer Science 7 5%
Psychology 6 4%
Other 22 16%
Unknown 44 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,818,952
of 15,922,017 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#804
of 5,494 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,776
of 275,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,017 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,494 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them