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Evaluating insulin information provided on discharge summaries in a secondary care hospital in the United Kingdom

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, August 2017
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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluating insulin information provided on discharge summaries in a secondary care hospital in the United Kingdom
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40545-017-0113-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amie Bain, Lois Nettleship, Sallianne Kavanagh, Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar

Abstract

Prescribing errors at the time of hospital discharge are common and could potentially lead to avoidable patient harm, especially when they involve insulin, a high-risk medicine widely used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. When information regarding insulin therapy is not sufficiently communicated to a patient's primary care provider, continuity of care for patients with diabetes may be compromised. The objectives of this study were to investigate the nature and prevalence of insulin-related medication discrepancies contained in hospital discharge summaries for patients with diabetes. A further objective was to examine the timeliness and completeness of relevant information regarding insulin therapy provided on discharge summaries. The study was undertaken at a large foundation trust hospital in the North of England, UK. A retrospective analysis of discharge summaries of all patients who were being treated with insulin and were included in the 2016 National Inpatient Diabetes Audit was conducted. Insulin regimen information provided on discharge summaries was scrutinised in light of available medical records pertaining to the admission and current national recommendations. Thirty-three (79%) out of the 42 patients included in the study had changes made to their insulin regimen during hospital admission. Eighteen (43%) patients were identified as having an error or discrepancy relating to insulin on their discharge summary. A total of 27 insulin errors or discrepancies were identified on discharge, most commonly involving non-communication of an insulin dose change (n = 8) and wrong insulin device (n = 7). Seventeen issues relating to completeness of insulin information were identified, including the omission of the prescribed time of insulin administration (n = 10) and unexplained insulin dose change (n = 4). Two patients who had insulin-related errors identified on their discharge summaries were readmitted to hospital within 30 days of discharge due to poor diabetic control. This small-scale study demonstrates that errors and discrepancies regarding insulin therapy on discharge persist despite current insulin safety initiatives. Poorly communicated information regarding insulin therapy may jeopardise optimal glycaemic control and continuity of patient care. Insulin-related information should be comprehensively documented at the point of discharge. This is to improve communication across the interface and to minimise risks to patient safety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Other 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,346,033
of 15,922,017 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#178
of 245 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,382
of 274,188 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,017 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 245 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,188 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them