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Alterations in hematologic indices during long-duration spaceflight

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Hematology, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
9 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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Title
Alterations in hematologic indices during long-duration spaceflight
Published in
BMC Hematology, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12878-017-0083-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hawley Kunz, Heather Quiriarte, Richard J. Simpson, Robert Ploutz-Snyder, Kathleen McMonigal, Clarence Sams, Brian Crucian

Abstract

Although a state of anemia is perceived to be associated with spaceflight, to date a peripheral blood hematologic assessment of red blood cell (RBC) indices has not been performed during long-duration space missions. This investigation collected whole blood samples from astronauts participating in up to 6-months orbital spaceflight, and returned those samples (ambient storage) to Earth for analysis. As samples were always collected near undock of a returning vehicle, the delay from collection to analysis never exceeded 48 h. As a subset of a larger immunologic investigation, a complete blood count was performed. A parallel stability study of the effect of a 48 h delay on these parameters assisted interpretation of the in-flight data. We report that the RBC and hemoglobin were significantly elevated during flight, both parameters deemed stable through the delay of sample return. Although the stability data showed hematocrit to be mildly elevated at +48 h, there was an in-flight increase in hematocrit that was ~3-fold higher in magnitude than the anticipated increase due to the delay in processing. While susceptible to the possible influence of dehydration or plasma volume alterations, these results suggest astronauts do not develop persistent anemia during spaceflight.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 27%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Student > Master 3 9%
Professor 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Engineering 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 9%
Sports and Recreations 2 6%
Other 7 21%
Unknown 7 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 89. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2021.
All research outputs
#302,187
of 18,593,253 outputs
Outputs from BMC Hematology
#2
of 80 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,763
of 280,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Hematology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,593,253 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,742 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them