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Perceptions of human papillomavirus vaccination of adolescent schoolgirls in western Uganda and their implications for acceptability of HPV vaccination: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, August 2017
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Title
Perceptions of human papillomavirus vaccination of adolescent schoolgirls in western Uganda and their implications for acceptability of HPV vaccination: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13104-017-2749-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Kampikaho Turiho, Elialilia Sarikieli Okello, Wilson Winstons Muhwezi, Anne Ruhweza Katahoire

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has been perceived in diverse ways some of which encourage its uptake while others could potentially deter its acceptability. This study explored community member's perceptions about HPV vaccination in Ibanda district and the implications of the perceptions for acceptability of HPV vaccination. The study was conducted following initial vaccination of adolescent schoolgirls in the district between 2008 and 2011. This qualitative study employed focus group discussions (FGDs) and key informant interviews (KIIs). FGDs were conducted with schoolgirls and parents/guardians and KIIs were conducted with school teachers, health workers and community leaders. Transcripts from the FGDs and KIIs were coded and analyzed thematically using ATLAS.ti (v. 6). The HPV vaccination was understood to safely prevent cervical cancer, which was perceived to be a severe incurable disease. Vaccinations were perceived as protection against diseases like measles and polio that were known to kill children. These were major motivations for girls' and parents' acceptance of HPV vaccination. Parents' increased awareness that HPV is sexually transmitted encouraged their support for vaccination of their adolescent daughters against HPV. There were reports however of some initial fears and misconceptions about HPV vaccination especially during its introduction. These initially discouraged some parents and girls but over the years with no major side effects reported, girls reported that they were willing to recommend the vaccination to others and parents also reported their willingness to get their daughters vaccinated without fear. Health workers and teachers interviewed however explained that, some concerns stilled lingered in the communities. The perceived benefits and safety of HPV vaccination enhanced girls' and parents' acceptability of HPV vaccination. The initial rumors, fears and concerns about HPV vaccination that reportedly discouraged some girls and parents, seemed to have waned with time giving way to more favourable perceptions regarding HPV vaccination although the study still found that a few concerns still lingered on and these have implications for HPV vaccination acceptability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 157 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 25%
Student > Bachelor 28 18%
Researcher 11 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 37 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 17%
Social Sciences 13 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 4%
Psychology 5 3%
Other 26 17%
Unknown 44 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2017.
All research outputs
#12,356,935
of 15,549,387 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,335
of 3,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,537
of 273,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 3,431 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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