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The effectiveness of permethrin-treated deer stations for control of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis on Cape Cod and the islands: a five-year experiment

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, January 2014
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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52 Mendeley
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Title
The effectiveness of permethrin-treated deer stations for control of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis on Cape Cod and the islands: a five-year experiment
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1756-3305-7-292
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jason S Grear, Robert Koethe, Bart Hoskins, Robert Hillger, Larry Dapsis, Montira Pongsiri

Abstract

The use of animal host-targeted pesticide application to control blacklegged ticks, which transmit the Lyme disease bacterium between wildlife hosts and humans, is receiving increased attention as an approach to Lyme disease risk management. Included among the attractive features of host-targeted approaches is the reduced need for broad-scale pesticide usage. In the eastern USA, one of the best-known of these approaches is the corn-baited "4-poster" deer feeding station, so named because of the four pesticide-treated rollers that surround the bait troughs. Wildlife visitors to these devices receive an automatic topical application of acaricide, which kills attached ticks before they can reproduce. We conducted a 5-year controlled experiment to estimate the effects of 4-poster stations on tick populations in southeastern Massachusetts, where the incidence of Lyme disease is among the highest in the USA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 50 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Other 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 11 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 40%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 12 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2015.
All research outputs
#13,854,527
of 21,340,745 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,869
of 5,177 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,347
of 202,522 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,340,745 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,177 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,522 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them