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The vitamin D receptor and inducible nitric oxide synthase associated pathways in acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle.

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, March 2011
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1 tweeter

Citations

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26 Mendeley
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Title
The vitamin D receptor and inducible nitric oxide synthase associated pathways in acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle.
Published in
Veterinary Research, March 2011
DOI 10.1186/1297-9716-42-48
Pubmed ID
Authors

Li RW, Li C, Gasbarre LC

Abstract

Cooperia oncophora is an economically important gastrointestinal nematode in ruminants. Acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle develops rapidly as a result of prior infections. Naïve cattle, when given a primary infection of high-dose infective L3 larvae, develop a strong immunity to subsequent reinfection. Compared to primary infection, reinfection resulted in a marked reduction in worm establishment. In order to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the development of acquired resistance, we characterized the transcriptomic responses of the bovine small intestine to a primary infection and reinfection. A total of 23 pathways were significantly impacted during infection. The vitamin D receptor activation was strongly induced only during reinfection, suggesting that this pathway may play an important role in the development of acquired resistance via its potential roles in immune regulation and intestinal mucosal integrity maintenance. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) was strongly induced during reinfection but not during primary infection. As a result, several canonical pathways associated with NOS2 were impacted. The genes involved in eicosanoid synthesis, including prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX2), remained largely unchanged during infection. The rapid development of acquired resistance may help explain the lack of relative pathogenicity by Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle. Our findings facilitate the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the development of acquired resistance, which could have an important implication in vaccine design.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Researcher 4 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Professor 2 8%
Other 8 31%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 8%
Unspecified 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2014.
All research outputs
#2,298,081
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#227
of 417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,247
of 107,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#14
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,507,509 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 417 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 107,376 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.